Descendants of EDWARD CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT)


Generation No. 1

1. EDWARD2 CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT) (WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 1640 in Dittisham, Devon, England (Source: Desc. of E. Cartwright, Mack), and died 02 Jul 1705. He married (1) MARY MORRIS ABT 1665. He married (2) ELIZABETH TROTT ABT 1675, daughter of JOHN TROTT and MARY BATSON. She was born 03 Jul 1651, and died 11 Aug 1729.

Notes for EDWARD CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT):
In 1992 I came across a two-volume history, the Cartwright-Northrip Ancestors, compiled by N. Almeda Boulton and Lloyd J. Cartwright, Saginaw Mich 1987. The authors of this book are descended from Nicholas, a brother of Edward, Jr. In the following account I quote from their work. Other statements are compiled from the publication Edward Cartwright of Nantucket Massachusetts: Some of his Descendants and their Allied Families, by Stanley L Mack Duluth Minnesota, 1936, and from items copied from sources at Nantucket by Barbara Cartwright Hartley while on her honeymoon in 1956.
The first known Cartwright in our line in America is Edward Cartwright, b. ca. 1640, presumably in Dittisham, Devon, England. Although not proven there is evidence that the family goes back in Devon for several generations.
In a manuscript prepared by Elizabeth Barney of Nantucket in 1861 there appears the following statement: "according to a statement by his son Edward Cartwright Jr., when he joined the Methodist church, Edward Sr. was born in Dittisham, Devonshire, in 1640." Almeda Boulton and Lloyd Cartwright found only fragmentary parish records from Dittisham in the Diocese Records Office in Exeter. A history of St. George's Church at Dittisham records that an unruly Cromwellian mob plundered the church rectory and burned the rector's books and the ancient parish registers. Only a few sheets remain for that period. The rector's records begin with 1651.
From the scanty records the Exeter files we did find records for Cartwright men born before 1640 who could have been the father or uncles of Edward Cartwright, Sr., for they bore the same names that Edward bestowed upon his sons born in America."
A Nicholas Cartwright of Dittisham and his wife Jane are possible parents of our Edward. Nicholas's father was Bryan Cartwright, who was in turn the son of a Nicollas Cartwrytt., the earliest found.
There are records (Boston Transcript, July 15, 1908) of two other Edward Cartwrights in the English colonies in the late 1600s. All three Edwards were fishermen or mariners and each had a wife named Elizabeth. The name is not a common one and it seems strange that there should have been three men having the same name living in the same area at the same time. From the scanty records available to us, it would appear possible that they were one and the same man. In all probability, however, Edward of Nantucket was the same Edward who was at the Isles of Shoals in Maine, and that Edward of Boston was a different person,
Our Edward (1640-1705) is first found on the Isle of Shoals, New Hampshire. "In Maine Court records (Gen. Dict. Maine and N.H, p.13l) we find that in 1670 Edward Cartwright of Hog Island (now Appldore).... was appointed to (or by) the Maine Court "grand juryman as Edward Carter [Cartwright] duly reported a dozen Shoals men for drinking and fighting. The early colonists abhorred professional lawyers and justices, so they would appoint men of character from among themselves to hold lay courts, hear charges and dispense justice in cases under 20 pounds... Thus it came about that Edward.., served in this capacity from time to time in the ocurt at York, which had jurisdiction over most of what is now the State of Maine, including the northern islands in the Isles of Shoals.
"The Isles of Shoals lie off the coast of Maine and New Hampshire, and the administration of the islands is divided between the two. 'Shoals' should properly be interpreted as 'schools,' or where the codfish school or abound in great numbers. Edward became an expert in taking and curing codfish, for the lcime was especially suited for that purpose. A fisherman could often {Jemess, "Isles of Shoals"] get eight or nine pounds (value) per man on one voyage. 'But it doth some of them little good, for the merchant (who picks up their catch], to increase his gain by pulling off his commodity in the midst of their voyages, and at the end thereof comes in with a walking tavern, a bark laden with the loegitimate blood of the grape, brandey, et.' This accounts in some measure for cases heard by Edward on Drunkenness and fighting.
"On July 4, 1671, Edward was involved in several cases against certain Shoals men for being 'drunk and fighting.' In one case against 'Thomas Pumery for breach of the Sabbath in seinding his boate from the Ysles of Shoals on the Lord's day, to the mayne in time of gods publique worshipe, 'he levied a fine of 10 shillings, 5 pence for non-appearance. In the case of William Wells 'for swearing by the name of god severall times' a fine of 5s and fees of 5s were levied. Edward was one of a grand jury of twelve men who prescribed that 'the Quaker's punishment, Moses Colinnes for his offence is to receive 20 stripes at the post. Sariah Mills for her offence is to receiv 20 stripes at the post Mary Mills to be admonished.' Mary was probably the young daughter of Sariah, On July 11, 1673, 'he (Edward) acknowledged indebtedness to Mr. Vaughn, and with consent of his wife Elizabeth, put himself apprentice to him (Mr. Vaughn) until he should have paid him 13 pounds value in fish.'"
Authentic records point to the conclusion that Edward Cartwright came to Nantucket in 1672. Edward Cartwright lived on Nantucket from the time he settled there in the spring of 1672 to the time of his death on July 2, 1705. "Nantucket records (Pollard papers indicate that Edward had a son named Nicholas with him when he came to the island. Nicholas is said to have been born in 1666 to Edward's first wife.... Apparently seven-year-old Nicholas came to Nantucket with his father, then aged 33 years. Edward married Elizabeth Trott, daughter of John and Ann Trott on Nantucket. To them were born; Sampson, Jan.26, 1677; Susanna, Feb. 1680-81; Edward, May 5, 1683; and Mary, June29, 1687 (Boston Transcript. 15, 1908). Elizabeth died Aug.12, 1729. Edward would have been 35. When he married his second wife, and Elizabeth would have been 24.
Edward purchased land (Nantucket Deeds, Bk 22, p.29) at Pocomo, a neck of land near Polpis Harbor at the eastern end of the island. He lived there all the rest of his life and added parcels to his holdings so that they extended from the harbor to Quidnet on the eastern shore. In October 4, 1676, he bought "one acre near the run" from Wat Noose, an Indian sachem. On 28 December 1678, a deed to Edward reads: "I, J. Watnoose for available sum of money in hand by me received, that is to say twenty-live shillings, have bargained and sold to Edward Cartwright of the Island of Nantucket halfe aker of marsh and meadow lying and joyning the meadow of Eliazer Foulger----." On the same day Edward also bought "one halfe acre" near Cartwright's house from Wauwinnet (another Indian). On March 3, 1679, he bought all of Wm. Worth's "halfe-share of upland in the English work sailor." and in April 1679 he bought from Wauwinnet "a piece of swampy land." Wauwinnet was the son of Watnoose.
"In 1964 we found an old home standing near Quidnet which, according to tradition quoted by Allen Norcross, its owner at that time, was 'built by Edward Cartwright for one of his three sons.' The land is described as 'part of share 8 in Squam, the George G. Cathcart farm in Quidnet, seven acres - 100 and 13/100 rods.' The Norcisos deed is dated l848 and Allen's grandfather lived there thirty years before he could pay the $500 on the mortgage. The kitchen floor of the old house had a definite 'crown,' for it was once the deck of a ship that came to griefon the treacherous Nantucket Shoals. It is most likely that this house belonged to Sampson.


The following are excerpt from Nantucket records copied by Barbara Hartley
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"April 6, 1679 - Wauwinnet to Edward Cartwright a piece of swamp land to the southward of Cartwright's house, lying in a straight line from John Swain's bridge to the corner of the ditch at Pompasson's land as may appear by the marks and from the said corner of the ditch on a straight line to the run of water in the swamp to the northward."

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Nantucket Lands and Land Owners, by Henry Bernard North, published in 1901, Nantucket Historical Assoc., Vol. 2, bulletin No. 1

(John Gardner, dueling for political power with Coffin faction ) p. 27: "On december 28, 1675 Stephen Hussey was fined for contempt of authority in saying to Capt. John Gardner 'Meddle with your own business. I gave Edward Cartwright authority to let his pigs run on the common.'
p. 64: "Edward Cartwright came from New Hampshire and settled at Nantucket about 1673, when he purchased the interest of William Worth on Pocomo, which was afterward confirmed by an Indian deed." "He married Elizabeth Trott and died 1705, leaving five children." "He never held any office was fined for drunkenness, assault, disturbing the peace, selling rum and for controversies with his Indian neighbors. Cartwright lived in 1680 on the harbor southwest of John Swaim's"

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From the Register of Deeds, p. 107
"Edward Cartwright's first experience in court occurred in Dec. 1676, when he was accused of speaking contemptuous words against authority. he was admonished and ordered to pay the fees of the Clerk."
p. 108
"In 1678 Edward Cartwright was convicted of being drunk and paid a fine of ten shillings."
"June 1679 James Skiffe and Edward Cartwright were convicted of fighting near the house of Thomas Look and at the house of James Coffin and were fined ten shillings each, although next month Skiffe was chosen Marshall."
p.109:
"Edward Cartwright was fined 5 in August, 1688 for 'retayling strong drink to the Indians."
p. 110:
"In March, 1697 Mark Mason paid ten 'shillens' for breach of the peace and Edward Cartwright recovered ten shillings against Stephen Pease 'about a mare'. "



Child of EDWARD CARTWRIGHT and MARY MORRIS is:
2. i. NICHOLAS3 CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT), b. 1666; d. 10 Jul 1706.


Children of EDWARD CARTWRIGHT and ELIZABETH TROTT are:
3. ii. SAMPSON3 CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT), b. 26 Jan 1676/77, Nantucket MA; d. 19 Jun 1741, Nantucket MA.
iii. SUSANNA CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT), b. 16 Feb 1679/80 (Source: Desc. of E. Cartwright, Mack); d. 18 Oct 1746; m. WILLIAM STRETTON, 16 Dec 1707.
4. iv. EDWARD CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT), b. 05 May 1683, Dittisham, Davenshire, England; d. 10 Nov 1752, Martha's Vineyard, Mass.
v. MARY CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT), b. 29 Jun 1687 (Source: Desc. of E. Cartwright, Mack); d. 02 Sep 1727.
vi. ALICE CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT).
vii. HEZEDIAH CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT).


Generation No. 2

2. NICHOLAS3 CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT) (EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 1666 (Source: History of Martha's Vineyard), and died 10 Jul 1706. He married ORANGE ROGERS, daughter of WILLIAM ROGERS and MARTHA BARNARD.

Children of NICHOLAS CARTWRIGHT and ORANGE ROGERS are:
i. HOPE4 CARTWRIGHT, b. 29 Aug 1699, Nantucket, MA (Source: Boulton); m. THOMAS CROOK, 24 Mar 1719/20.

Notes for THOMAS CROOK:
Last name may have been spelled Cook


ii. LYDIA CARTWRIGHT, b. 15 Oct 1701 (Source: Boulton); m. JOHN DESCOW.
iii. SARAH CARTWRIGHT, b. 13 Aug 1695 (Source: Boulton); d. 06 Jul 1719; m. GEORGE BROWN.
iv. ELINOR CARTWRIGHT, b. 14 Aug 1697 (Source: Boulton).
v. NICHOLAS CARTWRIGHT, b. Nov 1705 (Source: Boulton).


3. SAMPSON3 CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT) (EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 26 Jan 1676/77 in Nantucket MA (Source: (1) Desc. of E. Cartwright, Mack, (2) "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:27.), and died 19 Jun 1741 in Nantucket MA (Source: "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:27.). He married BETHIA PRATT ABT 1701 (Source: "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:27.), daughter of JOSEPH PRATT and DORCAS FOLGER. She was born 11 Feb 1679/80 in prob Charlestown MA (Source: (1) The Folger Family, Compiled by William Coleman Folger of Nantucket, a Corresponding Member of the N. E. Historic-Genealogical Society. , (2) "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:11, 8:27.), and died 19 Jun 1741 in Nantucket MA (Source: "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:27.).

Notes for SAMPSON CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT):
Ref: "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations", Vol. Eight, Degory Priest, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994.

The will of Edward Cartwright (Sampson's father), dated 28 Aug. 1705 left son Sampson one-third of his lands on Pocomock in Nantucket "where his house now stands."

On 20 Aug. 1712 Samson Cartwright, husbandman of Sherburn, and wife Bethiah, sold to John Swain alias England all their rights to land at Poskamookah except their dewlling house.

No Nantucket Co. PR for Sampson or Bethiah Cartwright.


Notes for BETHIA PRATT:
Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.
The source above has Bethia spelled Bethiah

Children of SAMPSON CARTWRIGHT and BETHIA PRATT are:
5. i. HAZADIAH4 CARTWRIGHT, b. 11 Mar 1706/07, Nantucket MA; d. 15 May 1791, Nantucket MA.
ii. ALICE (ALCE) CARTWRIGHT, b. 21 Sep 1702 (Source: Boulton); m. DAVID GWINN, 13 Oct 1722; b. of Salem.
iii. DORCAS CARTWRIGHT, d. prob died young.
iv. PHINEAS CARTWRIGHT, d. died young.
v. MARY CARTWRIGHT, d. died young.
vi. THOMAS CARTWRIGHT, d. died young.


4. EDWARD3 CARTWRIGHT, (CARTRIGHT) (EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 05 May 1683 in Dittisham, Davenshire, England, and died 10 Nov 1752 in Martha's Vineyard, Mass. He married (1) RUTH WEST 1704 (Source: Desc. of E. Cartwright, Mack), daughter of THOMAS WEST and ELIZABETH THOMAS. She was born 1685, and died 10 Nov 1752. He married (2) JANE MCGEE 01 Jan 1748/49, daughter of THOMAS MCGEE and MARY BLAIR.

Children of EDWARD CARTWRIGHT and RUTH WEST are:
i. SARA4 CARTWRIGHT, b. 1707.
6. ii. BRYANT CARTWRIGHT, b. 30 Sep 1711, Martha's Vineyard, Mass; d. 30 Jul 1780, Hopkinton, RI.
iii. EDWARD CARTWRIGHT, b. 1713; d. 15 Apr 1762; m. JANE MAGEE.
iv. ABNER CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Sep 1713 (Source: Stanley Livingston Mack's Book ); d. 24 Jan 1732/33.
v. CYRUS CARTWRIGHT, b. 01 Jun 1716 (Source: Stanley Livingston Mack's book.).
7. vi. SAMUEL CARTWRIGHT, b. 24 May 1717; d. 04 Jun 1793.
vii. GIDEON CARTWRIGHT, b. 19 Jan 1718/19 (Source: Mack).
viii. RUTH CARTWRIGHT, b. 03 Sep 1721 (Source: Mack).
ix. EDWARD CARTWRIGHT, b. 12 Sep 1723.
x. SETH CARTWRIGHT, b. ABT 1725; d. Bef. 1751.
xi. JUDAH CARTWRIGHT.
xii. SILAS CARTWRIGHT.


Generation No. 3

5. HAZADIAH4 CARTWRIGHT (SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 11 Mar 1706/07 in Nantucket MA (Source: (1) Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available., (2) "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:27, 8:74.), and died 15 May 1791 in Nantucket MA (Source: (1) Nantucket Vital Records 5:106, (2) "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:74.). He married ABIGAIL BROWN 07 Mar 1731/32 in Nantucket MA (Source: (1) Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available., (2) "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:74.), daughter of JOSEPH BROWN and TABITHA FROST. She was born 1715, and died 29 Jan 1797 in Nantucket MA (Source: (1) Nantucket Vital Records 5:105, (2) "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:74.).

Notes for HAZADIAH CARTWRIGHT:
Ref: "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations", Vol. Eight, Degory Priest, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994.
On 27 Sept. 1746 Hazadiah Cartwright of Sherburn, blacksmith, bought one acre near his dwelling house from Peter and Hope Coffin.

Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.
This source spells Hazadiah, Hezediah

Children of HAZADIAH CARTWRIGHT and ABIGAIL BROWN are:
i. PRISCILLA5 CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 Oct 1733; d. 12 Jul 1810 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.).

Notes for PRISCILLA CARTWRIGHT:
Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.
Died single


8. ii. JAMES CARTWRIGHT, b. 08 Jul 1735, Nantucket, MA; d. 29 Oct 1822, Nantucket, MA.
9. iii. RACHEL CARTWRIGHT, b. 09 Aug 1737, Nantucket, MA; d. 03 Jul 1776, Nantucket, MA.
iv. MARY CARTWRIGHT, b. 29 Sep 1739, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.); d. 22 May 1819, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.); m. EBENEZAR COFFIN, 01 Mar 1759.

Notes for MARY CARTWRIGHT:
Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. Proof of marriage

10. v. ABIGAIL CARTWRIGHT, b. 26 Jul 1742, Nantucket, MA; d. 27 Sep 1826, Nantucket, MA.
vi. JOSEPH CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 Jun 1743.
vii. JONATHAN CARTWRIGHT, b. 22 Apr 1745, Nantucket, MA; d. 10 Dec 1789, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.); m. DEBORAH MACY, 17 Dec 1769, Sherborn in Nantucket (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.); d. 30 Apr 1771.
viii. THOMAS CARTWRIGHT, b. 29 Nov 1746, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.); d. at sea.

Notes for THOMAS CARTWRIGHT:
Died single at sea


11. ix. BENJAMIN CARTWRIGHT, b. 26 Nov 1747, Nantucket, MA; d. 13 Jan 1812, Nantucket, MA.
x. BETHIAH CARTWRIGHT, b. 05 Oct 1750, Nantucket, MA; d. 10 Jan 1793, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.); m. JOHN MACY, Mar 1768 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.).
12. xi. JOHN CARTWRIGHT, b. 30 Aug 1752, Nantucket, MA; d. 26 Apr 1837, Nantucket, MA.
xii. ELIHU CARTWRIGHT, b. 1754 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.).
xiii. WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT, b. 13 Dec 1755; d. Jul 1813, at sea (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.).

Notes for WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT:
Died single at sea


xiv. SETH CARTWRIGHT, b. 08 Jan 1760; d. 29 Mar 1811; m. POLLY (MNU) CARTWRIGHT, VA.


6. BRYANT4 CARTWRIGHT (EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 30 Sep 1711 in Martha's Vineyard, Mass, and died 30 Jul 1780 in Hopkinton, RI. He married ELIZABETH WEEKS Oct 1732, daughter of JOSEPH WEEKS and ABIGAIL WEST.

Children of BRYANT CARTWRIGHT and ELIZABETH WEEKS are:
i. JUDAH5 CARTWRIGHT, b. 03 Aug 1733; d. 05 Aug 1767.
ii. ABIGAIL CARTWRIGHT, b. 30 Dec 1736; d. 07 Nov 1764.
iii. DOROTHA CARTWRIGHT, b. 1738; d. 23 Nov 1758.
13. iv. BRYANT CARTWRIGHT, JR, b. 03 May 1739; d. 1817.
v. IVDIA CARTWRIGHT, b. 31 Mar 1746; d. 20 Nov 1820.


7. SAMUEL4 CARTWRIGHT (EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 24 May 1717, and died 04 Jun 1793. He married ANNA SWAIN 09 Nov 1742, daughter of JOHN SWAIN. She died 16 Oct 1794.

Children of SAMUEL CARTWRIGHT and ANNA SWAIN are:
14. i. BENJAMIN5 CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 Nov 1750; d. 23 Nov 1803.
ii. DEBORAH CARTWRIGHT, b. 16 Aug 1748; d. 20 Oct 1828.
iii. JONATHAN CARTWRIGHT, b. 02 Jun 1753.
iv. ELIZABETH CARTWRIGHT, m. PELEG SWAIN, JR.
v. PHEBE CARTWRIGHT, m. NASON MEDER, 29 May 1767.


Generation No. 4

8. JAMES5 CARTWRIGHT (HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 08 Jul 1735 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.), and died 29 Oct 1822 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.). He married (1) RUTH GARDNER 13 Feb 1757, daughter of URIAH GARDNER and RUTH BUNKER. She died 31 May 1757. He married (2) LOVE MACY 08 Feb 1759 in Sherborn in Nantucket, daughter of FRANCIS MACY and JUDITH COFFIN.

Notes for JAMES CARTWRIGHT:
Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.
Proof of his marriages


Notes for RUTH GARDNER:
No children


Children of JAMES CARTWRIGHT and LOVE MACY are:
15. i. JOSEPH6 CARTWRIGHT, b. 11 Nov 1768; d. 09 Mar 1831.
ii. LOVE CARTWRIGHT, b. 14 Jan 1771; m. HENRY BARNARD, 04 Jul 1793.
iii. LYDIA CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Jan 1762; d. 11 Feb 1833 (Source: Source: "Early Settlers of Nantucket , Their Associates and Descendants", compiled by Lydia S Hinchman, Pub., Ferris & Leach, 1901.); m. PELEG MITCHELL, 30 Dec 1779 (Source: Source: "Early Settlers of Nantucket , Their Associates and Descendants", compiled by Lydia S Hinchman, Pub., Ferris & Leach, 1901.); b. 09 Feb 1759 (Source: Source: "Early Settlers of Nantucket , Their Associates and Descendants", compiled by Lydia S Hinchman, Pub., Ferris & Leach, 1901.); d. 02 Nov 1831 (Source: Source: "Early Settlers of Nantucket , Their Associates and Descendants", compiled by Lydia S Hinchman, Pub., Ferris & Leach, 1901.).
16. iv. PHEBE CARTWRIGHT, b. 17 Nov 1763.


9. RACHEL5 CARTWRIGHT (HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 09 Aug 1737 in Nantucket, MA, and died 03 Jul 1776 in Nantucket, MA. She married JABEZ MACY, JR 26 Feb 1767 (Source: "Genealogy of the Gordon-Macy Hiddleston-Curtis and Allied Families", by Jessie Gordon Flack and Maybelle Gordon Carman, Pub. J G Flack 1967.), son of JABEZ MACY and SARAH STARBUCK. He was born 30 Oct 1739 in Nantucket, MA (Source: "Genealogy of the Gordon-Macy Hiddleston-Curtis and Allied Families", by Jessie Gordon Flack and Maybelle Gordon Carman, Pub. J G Flack 1967.), and died Sep 1767 in At Sea (Source: "Genealogy of the Gordon-Macy Hiddleston-Curtis and Allied Families", by Jessie Gordon Flack and Maybelle Gordon Carman, Pub. J G Flack 1967.).

Child of RACHEL CARTWRIGHT and JABEZ MACY is:
i. LYDIA6 MACY, m. URIEL STARBUCK.


10. ABIGAIL5 CARTWRIGHT (HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 26 Jul 1742 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.), and died 27 Sep 1826 in Nantucket, MA. She married BARNABAS GARDNER 09 Feb 1760, son of JONATHAN GARDNER and PATIENCE BUNKER.

Notes for BARNABAS GARDNER:
Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.
This reference has his parents listed as Jonathan and Patience.

Child of ABIGAIL CARTWRIGHT and BARNABAS GARDNER is:
17. i. PRISCILLA6 GARDNER.


11. BENJAMIN5 CARTWRIGHT (HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 26 Nov 1747 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.), and died 13 Jan 1812 in Nantucket, MA. He married (1) ELIZABETH BUNKER 29 Oct 1772, daughter of DAVID BUNKER and ELIZABETH GORHAM. She was born 28 Jun 1754, and died 25 Mar 1787. He married (2) ABIGAIL (PADDOCK) GARDNER 24 Apr 1788, daughter of JONATHAN PADDOCK.

Notes for BENJAMIN CARTWRIGHT:
Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available.
Proof of marriages

Children of BENJAMIN CARTWRIGHT and ELIZABETH BUNKER are:
i. DAVID6 CARTWRIGHT, b. 26 Nov 1772; d. 1793, Lost at sea.

Notes for DAVID CARTWRIGHT:
Lost at sea with William Bunker


ii. LOIS CARTWRIGHT, b. 30 Oct 1774; m. (1) RICHARD BUNKER, JR; m. (2) PAUL RAY.
iii. THOMAS CARTWRIGHT, b. 13 Jun 1776.
18. iv. THOMAS CARTWRIGHT, b. 19 Aug 1778; d. Mar 1813.
v. EUNICE CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 Jan 1780; m. JAMES PROCTER MYRICK, 21 Aug 1800.
vi. WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT, b. 02 Nov 1781; d. 1813.
vii. ELIZABETH CARTWRIGHT, b. 14 Nov 1784; m. SETH SWAIN, 30 Aug 1804.
viii. PRISCILLAH CARTWRIGHT, b. 15 Jul 1785; d. 03 Sep 1785.


Children of BENJAMIN CARTWRIGHT and ABIGAIL GARDNER are:
ix. DAVID6 CARTWRIGHT, b. 25 Aug 1794; d. 22 Aug 1795.
19. x. FREDERICK CARTWRIGHT, b. 31 Dec 1796; d. 10 Aug 1844.
xi. LYDIA CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 May 1799; m. JOHN FOSTER COFFIN, 03 Mar 1818.
xii. MARY CARTWRIGHT, b. 24 May 1789; m. JOHN G WHIPPEY, 16 Aug 1810.
20. xiii. ALEXANDER CARTWRIGHT, b. 08 Jan 1793.


12. JOHN5 CARTWRIGHT (HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 30 Aug 1752 in Nantucket, MA (Source: (1) "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations," Vol. 8, General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1994, 8:74., (2) Nantucket, MA VR 1:179.), and died 26 Apr 1837 in Nantucket, MA (Source: (1) Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available., (2) Nantucket, MA VR 5:106.). He married MARY STARBUCK 16 Nov 1776 in Nantucket, MA (Source: (1) "History Nantucket County, Island & Town," Alexander Starbuck, Chas. Tuttle Co. Rutland VT 1969, p. 809, (2) Nantucket, MA VR 3:180, 4:399.), daughter of EDWARD STARBUCK and DAMARIS WORTH. She was born 18 Aug 1756 in Nantucket MA (Source: Nantucket, MA VR 2:506.), and died 30 Mar 1839 in Nantucket MA (Source: (1) Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997) , (2) Nantucket, MA VR 5:107.).

Notes for JOHN CARTWRIGHT:
Merchant & Shipmaster, general debility

Source: "Historic Nantucket Magazine," Winter 2000, Volume 49, No. 1, pg 14
When John Cartwright (1752-1837) died in 1837, his candlehouse and cooper's shop were valued at $2,000 and the newspaper eulogized him as "having passed through a long and active life without an imputation on his integrity, or a desire to be otherwise than useful to his fellow men." These traits suggest that Cartwright chose to live by Quaker tenets, although he was not formally a member of the Society of Friends. Having his silhouette cut instead of his portrait painted was considered "proper" by the Society, expressing a "plain and simple" aestetic, without taking on worldly airs.

Notes for MARY STARBUCK:
Dates on family page are beleived to be more accurate

B. August 18, 1756: source History Nantucket Co. etc.
D. March 30, 1839: source Nantucket Vital Records 5:107


Children of JOHN CARTWRIGHT and MARY STARBUCK are:
i. HEPSIBETH6 CARTWRIGHT, b. 08 Sep 1777, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997) ); d. Mar 1831 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); m. MATTHEW JONES, 26 Oct 1801.
ii. JOHN CARTWRIGHT, b. 12 Jun 1779; d. Nov 1802, at sea in Barbadoes (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)).
iii. LYDIA CARTWRIGHT, b. 25 Sep 1783, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 07 Feb 1827, Nantucket, MA; m. FREDERICK HUSSEY, 01 Apr 1803; b. 11 Nov 1780, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 25 Dec 1852, Nantucket, MA.

Notes for FREDERICK HUSSEY:
Frederick married sisters, Lydia and Sally


iv. SALLY CARTWRIGHT, b. 23 Mar 1786, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 05 Jan 1874, Nantucket, MA; m. (1) SAMUEL GELSTON; m. (2) FREDERICK HUSSEY; b. 11 Nov 1780, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 25 Dec 1852, Nantucket, MA; m. (3) MATTHEW CLARK, 06 Sep 1807; b. of Boston.

Notes for SALLY CARTWRIGHT:
Sally is the second wife of Frederick Hussey. He first married her sister Lydia.


Notes for FREDERICK HUSSEY:
Frederick married sisters, Lydia and Sally


v. ELIZA CARTWRIGHT, b. 07 Feb 1788, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 14 Jan 1864, Nantucket, MA; m. THADDEUS COFFIN, JR, 18 Dec 1816.
21. vi. CHARLES WORTH CARTWRIGHT, b. 02 Jan 1790, Nantucket MA; d. 12 Aug 1873, Nantucket, MA.
vii. GEORGE B CARTWRIGHT, b. 11 Dec 1791, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 05 Jun 1862, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997) ); m. ELIZABETH HUSSEY, 19 Aug 1815.
viii. EDWARD S CARTWRIGHT, b. 07 Oct 1794; d. Nov 1813, lost at sea (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)).
ix. ANN (NANCY) CARTWRIGHT, b. 25 Aug 1796, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 28 Nov 1865, Boston, MA.
22. x. MARY CARTWRIGHT, b. 06 Nov 1797, Nantucket, MA; d. 20 Nov 1877, Nantucket, MA.
xi. EUNICE CARTWRIGHT, b. 30 Nov 1799, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 21 Aug 1822, Nantucket, MA; m. PETER FOLGER EWER, 02 Nov 1820; b. 15 Mar 1800, N..

Notes for EUNICE CARTWRIGHT:
First wife of Peter F Ewer


Notes for PETER FOLGER EWER:
Peter married sisters, Eunice and Mary Cartwright


13. BRYANT5 CARTWRIGHT, JR (BRYANT4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 03 May 1739, and died 1817. He married ELIZABETH RUTH HALL, daughter of THEODATY HALL. She was born 03 May 1749, and died 1837.

Children of BRYANT CARTWRIGHT and ELIZABETH HALL are:
i. BRYANT6 CARTWRIGHT, b. 26 Jun 1768; d. Aft. 1840.
ii. ELIZABETH CARTWRIGHT, d. 1854.
23. iii. JABEZ MACY CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Jul 1772, Hopkinton, Washington Co., RI; d. 18 Apr 1854, Wellsville, Allegany Co., NY.
iv. JAMES CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Jul 1772; d. 12 Sep 1822, Phillips Ferry IL.
v. WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Jan 1775; d. 03 Sep 1854.
vi. THEODATY CARTWRIGHT, d. 23 Sep 1849, Berlin, NY.
vii. CYRUS HALL CARTWRIGHT, b. 19 May 1779.
viii. PENELOPE CARTWRIGHT, b. 07 Oct 1782; d. 1851.
ix. SAMUEL CARTWRIGHT, b. ABT 1783; d. 1823.
x. JONATHAN CARTWRIGHT, b. 1785; d. 1785.
24. xi. DAVID C. CARTWRIGHT, b. 1785; d. 1816.


14. BENJAMIN5 CARTWRIGHT (SAMUEL4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 27 Nov 1750, and died 23 Nov 1803. He married REBECCA LUCE 09 Apr 1770, daughter of CORNELIUS LUCE. She died 14 Oct 1809.

Notes for REBECCA LUCE:
Rebecca may have been spelled Rebekah


Children of BENJAMIN CARTWRIGHT and REBECCA LUCE are:
i. BENJAMIN6 CARTWRIGHT, d. 09 Jan 1814; m. MARY GROSE; d. of Cape Cod.
ii. OBED CARTWRIGHT, d. 16 Mar 1811, at sea.
iii. PHEBE CARTWRIGHT, m. (1) JOHN GARDNER; b. of Kennebec; m. (2) JOSEPH SAYER; b. of Kennebec; m. (3) JOHN MCCORD, 01 Mar 1798.
iv. ALEXANDER J CARTWRIGHT, m. HESTER BURLOCK; b. of New York.
v. ANNA CARTWRIGHT, b. of Sherborn, Nantucket Co.; m. OBED JOY; b. of Sherborn, Nantucket Co..


Generation No. 5

15. JOSEPH6 CARTWRIGHT (JAMES5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 11 Nov 1768, and died 09 Mar 1831. He married PRISCILLA BROWN 05 Apr 1794, daughter of JOSEPH BROWN and MARY ELLIS. She died 16 Dec 1835.

Notes for PRISCILLA BROWN:
Frozen to death


Children of JOSEPH CARTWRIGHT and PRISCILLA BROWN are:
i. JOSEPH7 CARTWRIGHT, b. 15 Oct 1800; d. 16 Oct 1827; m. EMELINE BARNARD, 24 Feb 1825.
ii. GEORGE C CARTWRIGHT, b. 09 May 1807; d. 26 Aug 1828; m. ELIZA BROWN, 25 Oct 1827.
iii. JAMES CARTWRIGHT, d. 1827.


16. PHEBE6 CARTWRIGHT (JAMES5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 17 Nov 1763. She married DAVID STARBUCK, son of SILVANUS STARBUCK and MARY HOWES. He was born 10 Oct 1760.

Child of PHEBE CARTWRIGHT and DAVID STARBUCK is:
25. i. EDWARD C7 STARBUCK, b. Bef. 30 Dec 1798.


17. PRISCILLA6 GARDNER (ABIGAIL5 CARTWRIGHT, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH)

Child of PRISCILLA GARDNER is:
i. OLIVER C7 GARDNER, b. 1784; m. HANNAH MACY, 09 Apr 1807; b. 28 Feb 1788, Dunkirk, France; d. 1867.


18. THOMAS6 CARTWRIGHT (BENJAMIN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 19 Aug 1778, and died Mar 1813. He married ELIZABETH GARDNER 27 Sep 1798, daughter of SHUBAEL GARDNER and DEBORAH ELLIS. She was born 1780, and died 1813.

Child of THOMAS CARTWRIGHT and ELIZABETH GARDNER is:
i. DAVID GARDNER7 CARTWRIGHT, b. 1799; d. 1891; m. ELIZABETH CEELY, 26 Aug 1824; b. 1803.


19. FREDERICK6 CARTWRIGHT (BENJAMIN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 31 Dec 1796, and died 10 Aug 1844. He married ELIZA RIDDELL 15 Apr 1820, daughter of WILLIAM RIDDELL and BETSEY HUSSEY. She died 26 Jun 1828.

Children of FREDERICK CARTWRIGHT and ELIZA RIDDELL are:
i. SUSAN B7 CARTWRIGHT, m. THOMAS PADDACK.
ii. ABBY S CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 Oct 1828; m. OLIVER F JAMES.


20. ALEXANDER6 CARTWRIGHT (BENJAMIN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 08 Jan 1793. He married PHEBE JOY 03 Dec 1816, daughter of WILLIAM JOY and JEDIDAH MEADER.

Children of ALEXANDER CARTWRIGHT and PHEBE JOY are:
i. ALEXANDER7 CARTWRIGHT, b. 16 Aug 1824.

Notes for ALEXANDER CARTWRIGHT:
Alexander and Phebe are twins


ii. PHEBE CARTWRIGHT, b. 16 Aug 1824.

Notes for PHEBE CARTWRIGHT:
Phebe and Alexander are twins

21. CHARLES WORTH6 CARTWRIGHT (JOHN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 02 Jan 1790 in Nantucket MA (Source: (1) Nantucket Vital Records 1:177, (2) Barney (Eliza Starbuck) Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., #222 & 223.), and died 12 Aug 1873 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney (Eilza Starbuck) Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., #222 & 223.). He married SUSAN HAYDEN 10 Oct 1811 in Nantucket MA (Source: Nantucket Vital Records 3:178, 4:33 ), daughter of ABISHAI HAYDEN and MERAB PINKHAM. She was born 13 Nov 1791 in Nantucket MA (Source: Nantucket Vital Records 2:131 Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)), and died 24 Jun 1826 in Boston, MA (Source: (1) Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997), (2) Nantucket, MA VR 5:108.).

Notes for SUSAN HAYDEN:
Last name may have been spelled Haden


Children of CHARLES CARTWRIGHT and SUSAN HAYDEN are:
26. i. JOHN WILLIAM7 CARTWRIGHT, SR., b. 08 Sep 1812, Roxbury, MA; d. 19 Feb 1869, Nantucket, MA.
ii. CHARLES WORTH CARTWRIGHT, b. 08 Sep 1814, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 10 Aug 1830, Nantucket, MA.
iii. ELIZA H CARTWRIGHT, b. 29 Nov 1816, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997) ); d. 27 Aug 1872, Nantucket, MA.
iv. SUSAN H CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Apr 1819 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); m. JOHN G NEWELL, 13 Jan 1843.
27. v. EDWARD S CARTWRIGHT, b. 30 Mar 1821, Nantucket, MA.
vi. GEORGE B CARTWRIGHT, b. 30 Oct 1822, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); m. SARAH (MNU) CARTWRIGHT; b. , of Boston, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)).
vii. ANNA MARIA CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Feb 1824, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 01 Nov 1866, Nantucket, MA; m. LEONARD R SHELDON, Bef. 1850; b. of VT.

Notes for ANNA MARIA CARTWRIGHT:
Has twin brother Frederick H Cartwright


Notes for LEONARD R SHELDON:
Doctor


viii. FREDERICK H CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Feb 1824, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 16 Feb 1858, Nantucket, MA.

Notes for FREDERICK H CARTWRIGHT:
Frederick and Anna Maria are twins

22. MARY6 CARTWRIGHT (JOHN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 06 Nov 1797 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)), and died 20 Nov 1877 in Nantucket, MA. She married PETER FOLGER EWER 19 May 1825, son of SYLVANUS EWER and PEGGY FOLGER. He was born 15 Mar 1800 in N..

Notes for PETER FOLGER EWER:
Peter married sisters, Eunice and Mary Cartwright

Child of MARY CARTWRIGHT and PETER EWER is:
i. MARGARET F7 EWER, b. 26 Jan 1833; m. CHARLES EDWARD COFFIN.


23. JABEZ MACY6 CARTWRIGHT (BRYANT5, BRYANT4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 10 Jul 1772 in Hopkinton, Washington Co., RI (Source: Washington Co., RI Vital Records.), and died 18 Apr 1854 in Wellsville, Allegany Co., NY (Source: Descendants of Joseph Greene of Westerly, RI.). He married (1) UNKNOWN CARTWRIGHT ABT 1795. She was born in RI (Source: 1860 US Census.), and died ABT 1809. He married (2) MARY M. (MNU) CARTWRIGHT (Source: Eldon P. Cartwright, Des Moines, IA, Cartwright Genealogy - Eldon Cartwright.) ABT 1809. She was born 1792 (Source: Edward Cartwright, Lubbock, Texas, Cartwright Genealogy - Edward Cartwright.), and died Bef. 1830 (Source: 1830 US Census.). He married (3) SALLY GREEN CLAIRE ABT 1831 in Wellsville, Alegany Co., NY (Source: Greene Genealogy.), daughter of EDWARD GREENE and HULDA SWEET. She was born ABT 1793 in Brookfield, Madison Co., NY (Source: Descendants of Joseph Greene of Westerly, RI.), and died Bef. 24 Feb 1845 (Source: Rev. War Pension Records.). He married (4) MARY SWEET ABT 1846, daughter of JEREMIAH SWEET. She was born ABT 1763 (Source: Susan Nahas.).

Children of JABEZ CARTWRIGHT and UNKNOWN CARTWRIGHT are:
i. NANCY7 CARTWRIGHT (Source: Deed.), b. ABT 1797; m. (FNU) MARSH (Source: Deed.).
ii. MARY CARTWRIGHT, b. 17 Apr 1799, RensselaerCo., NY; d. 08 Oct 1889, Wellsville, Allegany Co., NY.
iii. TRUMAN D. CARTWRIGHT, b. ABT 1800, Brookfield, Madison Co., NY (Source: Gravestone.); d. 12 Aug 1876, Allegany Co., NY (Source: Gravestone.); m. ABIGAIL (MNU) CARTWRIGHT; b. ABT 1819, YatesCo., NY (Source: 1855 New York State Census.); d. 21 May 1857, Allegany Co., NY (Source: Gravestone.).
iv. CLARK PERRY CARTWRIGHT, b. ABT 1803, Allegany Co., NY; d. ABT 1878, Allegany Co., NY.
v. WASHINGTON CARTWRIGHT, b. ABT 1805 (Source: Eldon P. Cartwright, Des Moines, IA, Cartwright Genealogy - Eldon Cartwright.); d. 17 Aug 1824 (Source: Cemetery Record.).
28. vi. JABEZ B./M. CARTWRIGHT, b. 17 Aug 1808, Brookfield, Madison Co., NY; d. 11 Oct 1858, Village of Poynette in Columbia Co., Wisconsin.


Child of JABEZ CARTWRIGHT and MARY CARTWRIGHT is:
29. vii. JEREMIAH (JERRY)7 CARTWRIGHT, b. 1819; d. 16 May 1895.


Children of JABEZ CARTWRIGHT and SALLY CLAIRE are:
viii. WASHINGTON7 CARTWRIGHT.
ix. RILEY CARTWRIGHT.
x. MARY CARTWRIGHT.
xi. MARTIN CARTWRIGHT.


24. DAVID C.6 CARTWRIGHT (BRYANT5, BRYANT4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 1785, and died 1816. He married ABIGAIL WARREN, daughter of NATHANIEL WARREN. She was born 1791, and died 1872.

Child of DAVID CARTWRIGHT and ABIGAIL WARREN is:
30. i. DAVID WARREN7 CARTWRIGHT, b. 1814; d. 1899.


Generation No. 6

25. EDWARD C7 STARBUCK (PHEBE6 CARTWRIGHT, JAMES5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born Bef. 30 Dec 1798. He married ELIZA HUSSEY, daughter of ELIAB HUSSEY and LYDIA HUSSEY.

Child of EDWARD STARBUCK and ELIZA HUSSEY is:
i. EDWARD HUSSEY8 STARBUCK, b. 10 Aug 1828.


26. JOHN WILLIAM7 CARTWRIGHT, SR. (CHARLES WORTH6, JOHN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 08 Sep 1812 in Roxbury, MA (Source: Nantucket Vital Records 1:179 & Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997) ), and died 19 Feb 1869 in Nantucket, MA (Source: copy of Cert. of death Record #8.). He married ELLEN MARIA WELD 05 Jun 1832 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Nantucket Vital Records 3:180 ), daughter of JAMES WELD and ELEANOR CUSHMAN. She was born 21 Aug 1814 in Roxbury, MA (Source: Place: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)), and died 26 Apr 1873 in Roxbury MA.

Notes for ELLEN MARIA WELD:
Nantucket VR 2:611 has birth date Aug. 21, 1814

Research done by Certified Geneoligist, David T. Robertson, Genealogical Consultant & Family History Researcher, Telephone (617)- 479-3095, E Mail DTRobertson@Prodigy.net, P.O. Box 309, Quincy Center, Massachusetts 02269-0309, on August 23, 1998

Ellen Maria Weld was not born in Nantucket. In the book Vital Records of Nantucket she is the only Weld birth listed and following the entry is the source note "p.r.38" meaning private record 38. This record was the genealogical research of William C. Folger which was placed in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Association. The authors of Nantucket VRs noted "This compilation has been used because of the valuable clues it affords, but its statements should be received with caution, as it is not free from errors. It should be understood that in many instances the events recorded did not take place in Nantucket.." In fact I find evidence to doubt that Ellen ever lived on Nantucket. Her husband's family, the Cartwrights, did originate on Nantucket. It is possible that John W. Cartwright, Sr. was born there, though his birth record comes from the same source as his wife's. I found that their son John W. Cartwright Jr. also married a Boston woman, (Nantucket VR 179). Their daughter Ann Eliza married James H. Richardson of Boston, (Nantucket VR 177). Their son John W. married Mary J. Johnson of Boston, (Nantucket VR 179). This suggest to me that they lived in Boston not Nantucket.


According to David Freeman e-mail Dvfree@aol.com
He was doing research in family boxes and had turned up the family bible started when Ellen Maria Weld Married John W. Cartwright, Sr. The page where vital data is typically listed has a handwritten entry signed by JWC that they were married 5 June 1832 by George Gay Justice of the Peace.

This finding backs up other data he has that the 5 April 1832 date for the marriage in the Nantucket Vital Records 4:493 is wrong. John Jr. (his G Grandfather) was born 23 December 1832. Ellen Maria was two months pregnant when they were married. That explains why someone from a Boston Blueblood family was married by a JP rather than a minister.

Marriage Notes for JOHN CARTWRIGHT and ELLEN WELD:
From the Family Bible in the posession of David Freeman, 1509 Birch Anenue, Richland WA (address as of 1/1/2003) the marriage date was 6/5/1832 not 4/5/1832 as some records have it. The bible note was written by John William Cartwright himself and adds that Justice of the Peace George Gay performed the ceremony.
Since my G Grandfather John Jr. was born in December, this means Ellen Maria was quite pregnant when they were married. As further evidence is the fact that a JP married them. Ellen Maria Weld was from a very well known Boston Braman family and, under normal circumstances, a large church wedding would have been planned. Better to have a JP marry them and tell everyone they had been married earlier.


Children of JOHN CARTWRIGHT and ELLEN WELD are:
i. JOHN W8 CARTWRIGHT, JR, b. 23 Dec 1832, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); m. MARY PRISCILLA JOHNSTON, 1860 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); b. of Boston.

Notes for JOHN W CARTWRIGHT, JR:
According to Nantucket VR 179 John W. Cartwright Jr. also married a Boston woman.

Marriage Notes for JOHN CARTWRIGHT and MARY JOHNSTON:
Had 8 children - last was stillborn.

ii. ELLEN M CARTWRIGHT, b. 25 Nov 1834, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 04 Apr 1877, Nantucket, MA; m. HENRY L JONES; b. of Boston.
iii. SUSAN H CARTWRIGHT, b. 22 Feb 1836, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); m. PHILIP H FOLGER.
iv. ANNE ELIZA CARTWRIGHT, b. 23 Aug 1837, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); m. JAMES M RICHARDSON, May 1863 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); b. , of Boston (Source: Nantucket VR 177.).
31. v. CHARLES E. CARTWRIGHT, b. 14 Mar 1839, Nantucket, MA; d. 19 Mar 1877, Nantucket, MA.
vi. SARAH W CARTWRIGHT, b. 04 Mar 1841, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 30 Jun 1903, Nantucket, MA; m. WARREN B GALUCIA, Dec 1865 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); b. of Dedham, MA.
vii. JAMES W CARTWRIGHT, b. 03 Apr 1842, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997) ); m. EMILY J AVERY, Dec 1867; b. of Cincinnati, OH.

Notes for JAMES W CARTWRIGHT:
served in the civil war

viii. EDMUND G W CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 Aug 1844, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); m. CATHARINE (KATE) MCCOY, 1865 (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); b. Of Salem, MA.

Notes for EDMUND G W CARTWRIGHT:
Served with distinction in the civil war - an officer in a "coloured" heavy artillery unit.

ix. GEORGE FREDERICK CARTWRIGHT, b. 05 Feb 1846; d. 08 Feb 1846.
32. x. MARY STARBUCK CARTWRIGHT, b. 01 Oct 1849, Nantucket, MA; d. 06 Jun 1893, Wash DC Buried Oakhill Cem Georgetown.
xi. WALLACE CARTWRIGHT, b. 10 Feb 1853, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)).
xii. FREDERIC H CARTWRIGHT, b. 05 Oct 1855, Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)); d. 29 Dec 1901, San Antonio, TX (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)).


27. EDWARD S7 CARTWRIGHT (CHARLES WORTH6, JOHN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 30 Mar 1821 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)). He married (1) LOUISA WILLCOX. He married (2) LAURA WALLACE 30 Nov 1842.

Notes for EDWARD S CARTWRIGHT:
Laura Wallace and Louisa Willcox maybe the same person


Notes for LOUISA WILLCOX:
Louisa Willcox and Laura Wallace maybe the same person.


Notes for LAURA WALLACE:
Louisa Willcox and Laura Wallace maybe the same person.

Child of EDWARD CARTWRIGHT and LAURA WALLACE is:
i. EDWARD W8 CARTWRIGHT, b. 22 Feb 1845; m. EMMA S THOMPSON.


28. JABEZ B./M.7 CARTWRIGHT (JABEZ MACY6, BRYANT5, BRYANT4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 17 Aug 1808 in Brookfield, Madison Co., NY, and died 11 Oct 1858 in Village of Poynette in Columbia Co., Wisconsin. He married (1) UNKNOWN CARTWRIGHT. He married (2) LAURA WHITTMORE 01 May 1839 in Andover, NY. She was born 06 Sep 1813, and died 09 Dec 1859.

Children of JABEZ CARTWRIGHT and UNKNOWN CARTWRIGHT are:
i. WASHINGTON G8 CARTWRIGHT, b. 28 Sep 1829; d. 11 Oct 1858; m. BENNINA PAULINE DORCAS BAKER.
ii. RILEY CARTWRIGHT, b. 19 Jul 1831; d. 09 Dec 1859; m. ALZINA KAPLE.
iii. MARY CARTWRIGHT, b. 12 Mar 1834; m. HIRAM JAMES HARVEY.
iv. MARTIN V CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 Jan 1836; d. 22 Dec 1910.
v. MATTHEW CARTWRIGHT, b. 15 Jan 1839.


Children of JABEZ CARTWRIGHT and LAURA WHITTMORE are:
vi. THOMAS W.8 CARTWRIGHT, b. 29 Sep 1840; d. 02 Mar 1863.

Notes for THOMAS W. CARTWRIGHT:
unmarried - no children


vii. MARTHA A. CARTWRIGHT, b. 22 Aug 1843; m. (1) JAMES COLLINS, 23 Sep 1860; m. (2) CORNELIUS ALLEN, 20 Apr 1881.

Marriage Notes for MARTHA CARTWRIGHT and JAMES COLLINS:
Martha married James Collins, father of Nancy's husband (Thomas Collins) making her Nancy's mother-in-law.

viii. TRUMAN J. CARTWRIGHT, b. 15 Jul 1846; d. 14 Jan 1868.
ix. NANCY M. CARTWRIGHT, b. 26 Jan 1849; m. THOMAS COLLINS.
x. SAMUEL W. CARTWRIGHT, b. 02 Jul 1853; m. VIOLA J. ANABAL.


29. JEREMIAH (JERRY)7 CARTWRIGHT (JABEZ MACY6, BRYANT5, BRYANT4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 1819, and died 16 May 1895. He married (1) HULDA CLARE, (CLAIR). She was born 1819, and died 06 Mar 1875. He married (2) PHOEBE SEWARD HARRISON. She was born 1849.

Children of JEREMIAH CARTWRIGHT and HULDA CLARE are:
i. LORENZO8 CARTWRIGHT, b. 18 Dec 1835; d. 02 Mar 1865, Jefferson Indiana, Civil War.
ii. JABEZ CARTWRIGHT, b. 1838.
iii. LAFAYETTE CARTWRIGHT, b. 1839; d. 1904, Alfred Station, NY.
iv. HARRY (HENRY) CARTWRIGHT, b. 1841; d. Civil War.
v. FIDELIA (PHIDELIA) CARTWRIGHT, b. 1843; d. 1864.
vi. DELIGHT CARTWRIGHT, b. 1850.
vii. DEVILLO CARTWRIGHT, b. 27 May 1854; d. 08 Nov 1936, Greenwood, NY; m. ELLEN EDWARDS.


Children of JEREMIAH CARTWRIGHT and PHOEBE HARRISON are:
viii. DELOS CARTWRIGHT8, b. 1877.
ix. OLIVE CARTWRIGHT, b. 1879; d. 1954, Andover, NY; m. JOSEPH MONROE.
x. DARIUS CARTWRIGHT, b. 1881; d. 1954, Andover, NY.
xi. CHARLES CARTWRIGHT, b. 1885; d. 03 Dec 1933.
xii. MARY CARTWRIGHT, b. 1888; d. 1944; m. JOHN RYAN.


30. DAVID WARREN7 CARTWRIGHT (DAVID C.6, BRYANT5, BRYANT4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 1814, and died 1899. He married ELSIE MAPES.

Child of DAVID CARTWRIGHT and ELSIE MAPES is:
33. i. PAUL WILLARD8 CARTWRIGHT, b. 1844; d. 1931.


Generation No. 7

31. CHARLES E.8 CARTWRIGHT (JOHN WILLIAM7, CHARLES WORTH6, JOHN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 14 Mar 1839 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997)), and died 19 Mar 1877 in Nantucket, MA. He married ELVIRA O BRADWATER. She was born in of VA.

Children of CHARLES CARTWRIGHT and ELVIRA BRADWATER are:
i. CHAERLS E.9 CARTWRIGHT.
ii. FREDERICK G. CARTWRIGHT.
iii. ANNIE M. CARTWRIGHT.


32. MARY STARBUCK8 CARTWRIGHT (JOHN WILLIAM7, CHARLES WORTH6, JOHN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 01 Oct 1849 in Nantucket, MA (Source: Nantucket, MA VR 1:180.), and died 06 Jun 1893 in Wash DC Buried Oakhill Cem Georgetown (Source: Oak Hill Cem. Records.). She married GEORGE WILLIAM COFFIN 18 Dec 1866 in Nantucket MA (Source: (1) Barney Genealogical Record, a 1594-page holograph document in the possession of the Nantucket Historical Assoc., considered to be the most accurate of any genealogical records of Nantucket now available. (1/1997), (2) Copy of Cert of Marriage.), son of FRANCIS COFFIN and EMELINE WYER. He was born 22 Dec 1845 in Nantucket Island MA (Source: Nantucket Vital Records 1:276 ), and died 15 Jun 1899 in Yokohama Japan Buried Oakhill Cem Georgetown (Source: Oak Hill Cem. Records.).

Notes for MARY STARBUCK CARTWRIGHT:
Supposedly had only one child.
Vital Records has b 10/1/1849
Cemetary records has 9/30/1847

Notes for GEORGE WILLIAM COFFIN:
On July 20,1858, Timothy W Calder and Francis E Coffin (his brother) were appointed guardians of a minor son of Francis C Coffin and Emeline Coffin both deceased.

He was appointed as an acting midshipman from MA. He rose steadily and was commissioned a Captain on September 27, 1893. In 1863, he was assigned to the Sloop Ticonderoga. He served in 1864/65 in both attacks on Fort Fisher, being wounded in the ground assault. In 1884 he commanded the Rtr. ALERT of the Greeley Relief Expidition under Schley. He retired in 1897 because of ill health.

The following is from a letter attached to George William Coffin's portrait, Perhaps his Obituary, Portrait currently owned by Langley Hoge Kenzie (1/1/94):

George William Coffin was born at Nantucket, MA Dec. 23, 1845, son of Francis C. and Emiline (Wyer) Coffin. Tristam Coffin, his first paternal American ancestor, was one of the first settlers of Nantucket. The descent from him and his wife Dionis Stevens being through James and Mary (Severance) Coffin: and Charles and Miriam (Parker) Coffin, the grandparents of George W.

Entering the U.S. Naval Academy in 1860 he was graduated and commissioned an ensign in 1863 and assigned to the steam sloop "Ticonderoga" of the North Atlantic blockading squadron in which he served until the end of the Civil War, participating in all actions in which that vessel took part. He was severely wounded in the land assault on Fort Fisher, North Carolina, but continued in command of his men until the Blue Jackets were withdrawn. For conspicuous bravery on this occasion he was especially commended in dispatches, and by a special act of congress was given a medal and the thanks of Congress and was advanced 30 numbers in grade. He was promoted to Master and Lieutenant in 1866, to Lieutenant Commander in 1868, to Commander in 1878, and to Captain in 1893.

After the Civil War he served on the "Shawmut" on the Brazilian Station 1866-67, on the "Franklin", Admiral Farrauut's flagship on the Mediterranean Station 1867-68, and at the U.S. Naval Academy 1868-69. In 1870 he was made Chief of Staff of the North American Fleet. He commanded several ships both on the east and west coasts and in foreign waters.

In 1884 he answered the request of the Navy Department to volunteer for the relief expedition under Admiral Winfield Scott Schley to go to the Arctic in search of Lieutenant Adolphus W. Greely and his party. He was placed in command of the "Alert", lent to the U.S. Government by Queen Victoria, one of the three vessels to make up the expedition. The exigencies of this command required him at one period to spend seventy-two hours in the crow's nest look-out and the leg which had sustained the wound during the Civil War became frost-bitten. This was a source of continued trouble to him and was a partial reason for his eventual retirement.

In 1886 he was again on duty in the Mediterranean and upon his return was made chief of the Lighthouse Division which was then under the Navy. Upon the death of his wife he requested a return to sea duty. In 1895 he took the cruiser "Charleston" to the Pacific, making official records of the waters of Manila Bay. These were filed with the Navy Department and given to Admiral Dewey and used by him (together with a personal letter from Captain Coffin who had been a classmate and close friend) in navigation at The Battle of Manila.

Due to ill health Captain Coffin was placed on the retired list in 1897, but on the outbreak of the Spanish-American War he applied, against advice, for active duty and was placed in charge of the 12th Lighthouse District.

Captain Coffin designed and patented a novel safety keel made of wood and steel for use on Navy and other vessels to protect them from damage in the event of running aground. It was first used on the Lighthouse Service Cutter "Columbine".

He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and a member of the Army and Navy Club of Washington, D.C., Bohemian Club of San Francisco, and the Yokohama (Japan) Club, where he resided after his retirement from the Navy, and where his son-in-law, Medical Inspector Frank Anderson, U.S. Navy was in charge of the Naval Hospital.

Captain Coffin was a brave and efficient officer, devoted to the service of his country, able in the performance of duty and highly esteemed by his fellow officers and superiors. He was a man of cheerful good nature and deep felling, and had many warm friends.

He was married at Nantucket, Mass., December 18, 1866, to Mary Starbuck Cartwright, daughter of John Cartwright, of Boston, Mass., and had a daughter, Eleanor Calder Coffin, wife of Dr. Frank Anderson, U.S. Navy, and two grand-daughters, Dorthy Morgan and Eleanor Anderson.

He died at Yokohama, Japan, June 15, 1899. He requested that his ashes be placed beside his wife in Oak Hill Cemetery, Georgetown, D.C. instead of at Arlington National Cemetery, and this was done.


THIS IS AN ARTICAL FROM HARPER'S WEEKLY APRIL 19, 1884

THE GREELY RELIEF EXPEDITION

The third relief party, which proposes to attempt the rescue of Lieutenant A. W. Greely and followers, is now in readiness for departure at the Brooklyn Navy-yard. This is the most powerfully equipped expedition which has as yet been organized for exploration in the arctic regions. Commander W. S. Schley, in charge, has had the wealth of experience, failure, and disaster of the many previous expeditions on which to base a plan of extraordinary preparation. The crushed ships, the unknown, unmarked graves, the frozen dead, and the mourners of all nations are specters which rise to demand that every emergency shall be met. The inceptive theory held that for arctic exploration ships constructed especially for such service were necessary. Hence the purchase of two vessels built at Dundee, Scotland-the Bear, a sealing, and the Thetis, a whaling steamer, in addition to the steamer Alert presented by England. So nearly alike are these vessels that each approximates 210 feet in length over all, 30 feet in breadth, 19 feet in depth, and a tonnage of 490 tons. A slight dissimilarity in appearance is caused by the Bear having her machinery and smoke-stack well forward, and the Thetis hers well aft. When these steamers arrive their previous service was instanced in their oily, fishy odors, greasy wood-work, foul holds, and unpainted and begrimed appearance. A swarm of laborers relieved the dreary evidences of rough usage. The Construction Department of the navy formulated plans to thoroughly overhaul the hulls, strengthen the strong parts, and make strong the weak ones. The Engineer Department undertook an examination of every bolt and part of the machinery and running gear. The Ordnance and Storage departments looked after the magazines and stores.

It will be remembered that the Jeannette was crushed in the ice like a mere egg-shell. To prevent such a possibility the present vessels received extra hold beams braced diagonally with seventeen sets of braces. These braces run from the hold beams diagonally down to the turned bulge on either side of the vessel. The forward holds have been divided by collision or watertight bulk-heads. Forward of these, under the berth-decks, are ponderous beams. By the means of eleven sets of hooks and two of pointers, running from the berth deck beams to the throat-lines and keelsons, the force of the ice received forward is transmitted to the berth-deck beams themselves. The stems and forward dead-woods have an enormous thickness of six and a half feet of timber. The hold and main-deck beams are supported from the top of the keelsons by hold and between-deck stanchions of oak. Thus the force of the ice received on the bottoms is transmitted clear to the decks. Besides this, the bottoms have eight inches of planking, one foot of floor timber, seventeen inches of keelson, and ten inches of keel, making the great total thickness of four feet lacking one inch. The vessels are double-planked with green heart six feet above and six feet below water. These arrangements are regarded as proof presumptive that there is no possibility of crushing by ice. Yet it will seem that the vessels are not strengthened aft, particularly where the magazines and medical stores are placed in the bulk-heads, and where an ice-floe is as liable to operate as elsewhere.

These vessels have an approximate light draught of ten feet, and a low draught of seventeen feet, allowing five feet free board. Their light displacement is 850 tons, low displacement 1560 tons, and a displacement available for cargo of about 700 tons each.

The living arrangements for officers and crews are in innovation on standard methods. The cabins were torn out. State-rooms were reserved only for captains and ice pilots. There is a single room for the officers on either vessel, surrounded by berths. By this means there is and economy of fuel, and better heating for all. For the crews is a house on each vessel's deck, extending forty-one feet back from the forecastle, with room for thirty seamen in each. The houses are water-tight, and protected from the weather by two thicknesses of sheeting, with a thick layer of felt between. The bulk-heads are divided into magazine and medical storage compartments. The former contain in each 2000 pounds of blasting powder, 1000 pounds of gun-cotton, thirty rifles and sporting pieces, a harpoon gun for walrus and other large game, and necessary ammunition.

The experience of arctic expeditions has been that to the ordinary foods of the sailor is largely due to disease of scurvy, discontent, and melancholy. A remarkable feature of the present expedition is its immense stores of foods of every possible variety, delicacy, and nutritive value. From a volume indexing one hundred and seventy-five tons of food a few samples may be mentioned in pounds: 101,920 of bread in tins; 25,480 of barley, oatmeal, Samp, and split pease; 7280 of rice; 3640 each of corn meal and buck-wheat; 911 each of vermicelli and macaroni; 450 each of cornstarch, tapioca, and farina; 228 of arrowroot; 600 of baking powder; 3640 each of sugar cakes and French compressed vegetables; 14,560 of fried potatoes; 36,700 of salt pork; 21,480 of bacon; 1840 each of sauces, pig jowl, hoc, etc.; 29,120 of salt beef; 911 of smoked beef; 3640 of beef tongue smoked; 14,520 each of raw and cooked hams and canned beef; 95,000 of canned stuffs; 7280 of canned mutton; 1820 each of fried oysters, raw oysters, mackerel, and salmon; 911 each of sardines and Liebig's extracts; 545 each of cabbage and sour-krout; 457 of Bologna sausage; 1820 of soup stuff; 3640 of half-pickled onions; 600 of sauces; 112 of garlic; 7280 of tomatoes; 1820 of plum-pudding; 1400 of prepared pumpkin; 3600 of mince-meat; 1800 each of apple-butter, raisins, butter, compressed tea, chocolate, nuts, etc.; 5000 each of cheese and lard; 300 each of mustard and spice; 400 of olive oil; 1300 of dried herbs; 100 of flavoring extracts; 4200 of lime juice; 30,000 of pemmican; 1820 gallons of beans; 911 gallons each of green pease, Lima beans, and corn; and hundreds of other items. It is urged as a further excuse for this extraordinary array of eatables that the Esquimaux use no money, and much of this food will be bartered for information, services, etc.

In the matter of clothing the preparations have been as elaborate as in foods. Indeed, it would seem impossible for one to walk under the burdens imposed. There are five hundred pairs of seal skin boots for sledging parties. These are made of skins of the hair seal, extend to the knee, are lined with wool, and have leather soles. They are also provided with in-soles. The hose is very long and heavy, extending above the knee, of red color. The under-wear is of extra heavy flannel, the wrappers being double and long. There are Jerseys of the heaviest quality. There are hoods of wool with capes, which have but small openings for the face. Accompanying these are wool mittens and wristlets. This is but the beginning of the costume. Next come oogjood-skin jackets to be cut and fitted as needed. There are sou'westers, or oil-skin suits, for damp weather; wool mufflers; heavy-grain leather boots; arctic overshoes reaching to the knee; rubber sandals with bottoms on them like a rubber door mat. In addition is all the regular line of clothing, from a pea-jacket down, that is worn by the sailor. Fifteen hundred rein-deer skin were converted into trousers, jackets, and hoods. There are blanket in-soles of three thicknesses of blanket and one of canvas; foot-nips of felt, made like a stocking , and reaching about to the ankle. All of the clothing is securely packed in bales, covered with enameled cloth, and having the seams covered with white lead.

One trouble heretofore has been with eyes. There are cases of freezing, and of blinding by the reflection of the sun on the ice and snow. To obviate this, goggles of every description are provided, with wire screens and eye shields.

Each vessel is provided with numerous small boats. On the starboard side is a steam ironclad launch, strongly built. There are two iceboats, which may be sailed on ice or in water, or drawn by hand or by dogs as sledges. Each ship has four whale-boats, for escape or other purpose. They are fitted with sails and oars, and have stanchions for the weather side to protect the occupants from the water. There are small sledges to be drawn by hand, and larger ones to be drawn by dogs, with which the expedition will be thoroughly provided. The dogs and Esquimaux interpreters will be shipped at Newfoundland.

The engines were thoroughly overhauled. They have 300 horse-power each, a speed of nine knots, and a capacity for ten tons of coal per day. There are powerful steam-pumps and ejectors to relieve the holds in case of leak. The improved distilling apparatus is fitted in such a way that no circulation of water is required, but cold air will act in its place. By means of these machines a plentiful supply of fresh-water will be secured.

The Brooklyn Navy-yard has sent forth and equipped the expeditions of Grinnell (the first American expedition after Franklin), Kane, the Polaris, the Tigress, and others. None of these had anything like the equipment of the Greely relief expedition number three. It is only to be regretted that Lieutenant Greely was not so well prepared, that he might to-day be quietly resting on the honors won in the arctic regius.

Was a Sea Captain. (Capt. USN) Thanks of Congress for conspicuous bravery. Severely wounded in assault on Ft. Fisher. Commanded ALERT in 1884 Expedition to Rescue Greely in Arctic.


THIS ARTICAL IS FROM THE COFFIN FAMILY NEWSLETTER, DATED NOVEMBER 1994
Address: c/o David P Coffin, 8907 Mohawk La Bethesda MD 20817
"GEORGE WILLIAM COFFIN"
Captain, U.S. Navy

In St. Peter's Chapel on Mare Island Naval Shipyard a Vallejo, California is a Tiffany window dedicated to George W. Coffin, who had a variable and notable career from his graduation from the Naval Academy in 1863 until his retirement due to ill health in 1897, two years prior to his death in 1899 at Yokohama Japan.

In addition to serving his country on land and sea as a naval officer, Captain Coffin designed and patented a novel safety keel made of wood and steel for use on Navy and other vessels to protect them from damage in the event of running aground. This keel was first used on the Lighthouse Service Cutter COLUMBINE.

George William Coffin was appointed from Massachusetts to the U. S. Naval Academy 20 Sep 1860 and was graduated and commissioned an ensign on 1 Oct 1863. He was assigned to the steam sloop TICONDEROGA of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron in which he served until the end of the Civil War. He participated in both assaults on Fort Fisher North Carolina and was severely wounded by a minieball in the right leg during the land assault on Fort Fisher. He continued in command of his men until the unit was withdrawn from the action. George W. Coffin was highly commended for conspicuous bravery and was advanced 30 numbers in grade by a special act of Congress.

Coffin was promoted to Master and Lieutenant 25 Jul 1866 and assigned to the steamer SHAWMUT of the Brazil Squadron. In 1867 he was assigned to the steam frigate FRANKLIN, Admiral Farragut's flagship on the Mediterranean Station of the European Squadron. Lieutenant George Coffin was promoted to Lieutenant Commander 12 Mar 1868 and assigned to the U. S. Naval Academy.

In 1870 Lt. Commander Coffin was Chief of Staff of the North Atlantic Fleet. He served in this capacity until 1871 when he was assigned to command the gunnery ship CONSTELLATION. In 1873 he was assigned to the Naval Academy where he served through 1874. He commanded the PLYMOUTH on the North Atlantic Station in 1875, the HARTFORD, flagship of the North Atlantic Station in 1875-6, the HASSLER of the Coast Survey 1876-8. George was promoted to Commander in 1878 and he served as Light House Inspector in 1881-4.

"In 1884 he answered the request of the Navy Department to volunteer for the relief expedition under Admiral Winfield Scott Schley to go to the Arctic in search of Lieutenant Adolphus W. Greely and his party. He was placed in command of the ALBERT lent to the United States Government by Queen Victoria, one of the three vessels to make up the expedition. The exigencies of this command required him at one period to spend 72 hours in the crow's nest look-out and the leg which had sustained the wound during the Civil War became frostbitten. This was a source of continued trouble to him and was a partial reason for his eventual retirement."

This was the third relief party sent by the Government to rescue the American Arctic explorer and his party of 25 who had been sent to establish a series of Polar stations in the Arctic regions. They had reached 83 degrees 24 minutes, the farthest north anyone had reached at that time and discovered land north of Greenland. By the time they were rescued by the third relief party of Captain Schley they had crossed Grinnell Land to the Polar Sea, suffering the utmost privations until starvation had reduced their number to seven, Greely being one.

In 1886 and 1887 he was again on duty in the Mediterranean Squadron commanding the steamer QUINNEBAUG. He was again a Light House inspector in 1898-9 and was Secretary of the Light House Board from 1889 to Nov 1892. Commander Coffin was on leave of absence from 1892 until 1894.

After his wife died in 1893 he requested a return to sea duty.
"In 1895 he took the cruiser CHARLESTON to the Pacific making official records of the waters of Manila Bay. These were filed with the Navy Department and given to Admiral Dewey and used by him (together with a personal letter from Captain Coffin who had been a classmate and close friend) in navigation at the Battle of Manila."

Captain Coffin was placed on the retired list in 1897 due to ill health, but on the outbreak of the Spanish American War he applied, against advice, for active duty and was placed in charge of the 12th Light House District.

George William Coffin, son of Francis Chase and Emeline (Wyer) Coffin, was born at Nantucket MA 23 December 1845 and died 15 June 1899 at Yokohama Japan where he had been living near his daughter and her husband, Naval Inspector Frank Anderson who was at the time in charge of the Naval hospital there. At his request his ashes were placed beside his wife in Oak Hill Cemetery at Georgetown, DC rather than in Arlington National Cemetery.

At the age of 10 years George's father died in South America and at 13 his mother died. On 20 Jul 1858 his older brother, Francis E. Coffin and Timothy W. Calder were appointed guardians of George William Coffin, minor child of Francis C. and Emeline Coffin, both deceased.

He married 18 Dec 1866 at Nantucket to Mary Starbuck Cartwright, daughter of John W. and Ellen Maria (Weld) Cartwright of Boston. They had a daughter Eleanor Calder Coffin born 30 Oct 1868 and a son George born 24 Jun 1869. Eleanor married 17 Jun 1886 Frank Anderson. We have no record of his son George after the birth recorded in the Nantucket town records. Eleanora was baptized at the Nantucket Episcopal Church 10 Jul 1870 and George, who would be a year old, was not. So it appears that George was deceased in his first year.

The following information was obtained from THE RECORDS OF LIVING OFFICERS OF THE U.S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS, Fifth Edition, revised, with Numerous Additions. It was published in Philadelphia: L.R. Hamersly & Co. in 1894, and was sent to me (Mrs. Sue Lemmon) from the Naval History Center, Washington, D.C.

George W. Coffin.--- Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20, 1860; Naval Academy, 1860-3. Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863; steam-sloop "Ticonderoga," North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher; wounded by a Minie'ball in right leg at land assault on Fort Fisher; steamer "Shawmut," Brazil Squadron, 1866. Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 25, 1866; steam-frigate "Franklin," European Squadron, 1867-8. Commissioned as Lieutenant Commander, March 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 1868-9; Chief-of-Staff, S.S. of North Atlantic Fleet, 1870-1; "Constellation" (gunnery-ship), 1871-2; Naval Academy, 1873-4; "Plymouth," North Atlantic Station, 1875; "Hartford." Flag-ship, North Atlantic Station, 1875-6; Coast Survey (commanding "Hassler"), 1876-8. Promoted to Commander, November, 1878; Light-House Inspector, 1881-4; ordnance duty, Navy Yard, New York, 1884-6; commanding steamer "Alert," Greely Relief Expedition, 1884; commanding steamer "Quinnebaug," Mediterranean Squadron, 1886-7; Light-house Inspector, 1888-9; Secretary Light-House Board, 1889, to November 1892; leave of absence, November. 1892, to

Source: "The National Cyclopedia" Vol. XXIX, by James T. White & Co 1941

COFFIN, George William, naval officer, was born at Nantucket, Mass., Dec. 23, 1845, son of Francis C. and Emeline (Wyer) Coffin. Tristram Coffin (q.v.), his first paternal American ancestor, was one of the first settlers of Nantucket Island, the descent from him and his wife Dionis Stevens being through James and Mary (Severance) Coffin; John and Hope (Gardner) Coffin; Richard and Ruth (Bunker) Coffin; Richard and Mary (Starbuck) Coffin, and Charles and Miriam (Parker) Coffin, the grandparents of George W. Coffin. Entering the U.S. naval academy in 1860, he was graduated and commissioned an ensign in 1863 and assigned to the steam sloop "Ticonderoga" of the North Atlantic blockading squadron, in which he served until the end of the Civil war, participating in all actions in which that vessel took part. He was severely wounded in the land assault on Ft. Fischer, N. C., but continued in command of his men until the blue jackets were withdrawn. For conspicuous bravery on this occasion he was especially commended in dispatches and by a special act of congress was given the thanks of congress and advanced thirty numbers in grade. He was promoted to master and lieutenant in 1866, to lieutenant commander in 1868, to commander in 1878 and to captain in 1893. After the Civil war he served in the "Shawmut" on the Brazilian station, 1867-68, and at the U.S. naval academy 1868-69. In 1870-71 he was chief of staff of the North Atlantic fleet. He commanded several ships of the navy in home and foreign waters and in 1884 was in command of the "Alert", a vessel lent to the U.S. government by Queen Victoria of England, which he took to the Arctic as one of the ships of the Greely relief expedition under Com. Winfield Scott Schley (q.v.). Because of ill health he was placed on the retired list in 1897 but on the outbreak of the Spanish-American war he applied for active duty and was placed in charge of the 12th lighthouse district. Coffin designed and patented a novel safety keel make of wood and steel for the use on navy and other vessels to protect them from damage in the event of grounding. It was first used on the lighthouse service cutter "Columbine". He was a companion of the California commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States and a member of the Army and Navy Club of Washington, D.C., Bohemian Club of San Francisco and the Yokohama (Japan) Club, where he resided after his retirement from the navy. He was a brave and efficient officer, devoted to the service of his country, able in the performance of duty and highly esteemed by his superiors and fellow officers. He was married at Nantucket, Mass., Dec. 18, 1866, to Mary Starbuck, daughter of John Cartwright, of Boston, Mass., and they had a daughter, Eleanor Calder Coffin, wife of Dr. Frank Anderson, U.S. navy. He died in Yokohama, Japan, June 15, 1899.date. Promoted Captain, 1893.

Marriage Notes for MARY CARTWRIGHT and GEORGE COFFIN:
Apparently only one child

Child of MARY CARTWRIGHT and GEORGE COFFIN is:
34. i. ELEANOR CALDER9 COFFIN, b. 31 Oct 1867, Nantucket MA; d. 30 Oct 1942, Elizabeth NJ, bur. Arlington.


33. PAUL WILLARD8 CARTWRIGHT (DAVID WARREN7, DAVID C.6, BRYANT5, BRYANT4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 1844, and died 1931. He married ELLEN ELIZABETH ACKLEY, daughter of JAMES ACKLEY and CAROLYN GOULD. She was born 1847, and died 1897.

Children of PAUL CARTWRIGHT and ELLEN ACKLEY are:
i. STELLA MAE9 CARTWRIGHT, b. 1867; d. 1867.
ii. CARRIE ELCY CARTWRIGHT, b. 1868; d. 1932.
iii. IDA EFFIE CARTWRIGHT, b. 1870; d. 1930.
iv. DAVID LAURENCE CARTWRIGHT, b. 1875; d. 1905.
35. v. MARIETTA CARTWRIGHT, b. 1877; d. 1969.
vi. MORTIMER DELANO CARTWRIGHT, b. 1883; d. 1965.
vii. PAUL WILLARD CARTWRIGHT, JR, b. Aft. 1883; d. 1975.
viii. PEARL MINNIE CARTWRIGHT, b. 1886; d. 1902.


Generation No. 8

34. ELEANOR CALDER9 COFFIN (MARY STARBUCK8 CARTWRIGHT, JOHN WILLIAM7, CHARLES WORTH6, JOHN5, HAZADIAH4, SAMPSON3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 31 Oct 1867 in Nantucket MA (Source: Certificate of Birth Record #42.), and died 30 Oct 1942 in Elizabeth NJ, bur. Arlington (Source: (1) Certified copy from a record of Death in the office of Registrar of Vital Statistics from the City of Elizabeth, N.J.., (2) Copy of Report of Interment from Arlington National Cemetery.). She married FRANK ANDERSON 17 Jun 1886 in St Martins in the Fields, Trafalgar Sq., London, England (Source: Certified copy Entry of Marriage Pursuant to Marriage Act 1949 #TF097446.), son of WILLIAM ANDERSON and LOUISA MORGAN. He was born 20 Jul 1852 in Stapleton, NY (Source: Naval Records of F. Anderson in "Abstracts of Service Records of Naval Officers", Vol. 15 pp 417, 219 in National Archives, Wash DC MF #M1325.), and died 31 Mar 1921 in Washington DC Bur. Arlington Cem. (Source: (1) Copy of Report of Interment from Arlington National Cemetery., (2) Naval Records of F. Anderson in "Abstracts of Service Records of Naval Officers", Vol. 15 pp 417, 219 in National Archives, Wash DC MF #M1325.).

Notes for ELEANOR CALDER COFFIN:
Baptized Episcopal Church of Nantucket apparently as Elenora per records at the church in Nantucket
Chr 7/10/1870
Known as Lena to her close friends.
An active Quaker in her later years.


Notes for FRANK ANDERSON:
Captain U.S. Navy Medical Corp
Baptised St John's Episcopal Church, Clifton, Staten Island 2/21/1853.Address today (1998) is 1331 Bay Street, Staten Island NY 10305 Ph 718-447-1605
Buried Arlington National Cemetary - Section 3 Grave # 4534

Source: Memoirs of Sidney Morgan Henry
In 1878 he was a medical officer in the Navy, twenty six years old, was a Passed Assistant Surgeon and was attached to the Receiving Ship Wabash.
He participated in the battle of Fisher's Island in the Civil War and had commanded one of the ships in the Greeley Relief Expedition.

Marriage Notes for ELEANOR COFFIN and FRANK ANDERSON:
Nantucket Town records show a son George Coffin born June 16, 1869-no further record of the son seems to exist.

Children of ELEANOR COFFIN and FRANK ANDERSON are:
i. DOROTHY MORGAN10 ANDERSON, b. 02 May 1887, New Brighton/Castleton NY (Source: Birth Cert..); d. 16 Jul 1979, Bristol RI - buried Jamestown RI (Source: Death Cert. #138-79-004660 State of RI.); m. PHILIP BARLOW HOGE, 16 Apr 1918, Washington DC (Source: Marriage Cert..); b. 10 Nov 1883, Washington DC (Source: 1900 Dist of Columbia Census.); d. 23 Jun 1964, South Kingston RI, - buried Jamestown RI (Source: Death Cert #4557 State of RI.).

Notes for DOROTHY MORGAN ANDERSON:
The following is a letter written by Dorothy Anderson Hoge sometime between 1965 and 1970..

ANDERSON FAMILY
Unfortunately, I don't know too much. Eleanor Fay and Reg Henry had as much as they could get from the family cousins in old letters in Halifax, N.S. Canada, but one of the early immigrant decendants, a son, became a doctor and established the first medical school in Vermont. Another one had three daughters, Harriet, Ann, and Dorothy. He was a lieutenant in the British army named Langley. That's where the Langleys came in. Harriet married William Astley Cooper Anderson who had studied medicine in Edinburgh as all good doctors did in those days, and also as had his father who named him after a famous doctor professor there. W.A.C Anderson was my great grandfather. He and Harriet migrated to Staten Island. His son, same name, married Louisa Morgan, whose father was a N.Y. banker. Her brother was the Uncle Charles whose portrait we have. My father and Lulie (the Henry's mother) and Willie, the only survivors of a number of children. Willie was crippled in some way, a recluse, moved back to Halifax. Ann Langley, great grandmother of the Creighton family in Halifax. Their mother, the cousin Helen we knew.

I'm not sure how the New Orleans property came into the family, but it was there in my Grandfather Anderson's day, through his wife Louisa Morgan who had inherited her shares. My father gradually bought up the Henry boys' divided inheritance as they came of age so that he owned all his mother's share, which set him somewhat ahead financially (eventually) of most U.S. Navy doctors.

HENRY
They don't know much of anything about the Henry antecedents, but their father's mother was a sister of President Buchanan. That's how he came to be President Buchanan's private secretary and special emissary to the court of St. James. He had two sons by his first wife who was a Magruder. So he was an older widower when Lulie Anderson was married to him. No doubt, he was supposed to be something, but my father, though I don't remember his ever actually saying anything, never liked him much and resented the way he took over her money (lost it), and used to go off to Europe with his older son, Joe, and leave his "sainted Lulie" with all those little boys and one servant. She died of pneumonia, taking care of baby Frank, and pregnant with the seventh. My father stuck around whenever possible and took care of the little boys who had everything. Jim nearly died of Diptheria. My father put a tube in his throat and sucked out the infection, Uncle Henry away. He didn't marry until after Lulie Died. Wanted to take Frank who was named for him, but Uncle Henry thought my mother too young and flighty. Frank and Reg, then one year and three years, were given to Aunt Hattie Irving to take care of, niece of Washington Irving, a nice old maid, reputed to have been engaged to marry my Grandfather Anderson after my grandmother died. She was nice, and always kept Frank, which was not too good for him. Aunt Belle Robson from Halifax came and took care of the other four boys for a few years, also Aunt Sidnay Morgan, Spinster, my grandmother's sister. Reg's records have most of this. I Told Sid about my father. He was surprised.

As the Henry boys grew older they were put into various not too expensive schools, except Frank, who went to a good school in Staten Island. My memory picks up where Aunt Hattie Irving (my Godmother) used to bring Frank to visit us in the 19th Street house in Washington. She dressed in black silk with a triangle of lace on her head topped with a lavender bow. I thought she was a hundred, but she was probably sixty. Frank was a sort of stilted, highly literary, anxious for playmates little boy, quizzical sense of humor which he always had, but blind in one eye which made him "different". He had several operations, which made it less obvious. I first remember Reg when he was about fourteen, came to George Washington Catholic Boarding School, spent his holidays with us. He thought he'd be a Bishop, it was a good job. Sid came too, and went to day school. He was sixteen. Still in short pants. Lived with us for a while, especially when my father was at sea, and my mother in the house alone with us, two servants. My grandparents Coffin had lived on R street until my grandmother died when I was six, and my grandfather applied for sea duty. He came back and lived with us in 1895-96. As the boys grew up, their father "placed" them, no special regard to what they wanted. Will, the eldest, at fifteen, went into railroad shops, (he wanted to be a doctor, but Uncle Henry said he couldn't afford anything and had Cassatt cousins) Jim into the Naval Academy, he wanted West Point. Rob into West Point, he wanted that, but failed in math for lack of any preparation, and his father said he disgraced the family and wouldn't do anything more for him. So Rob said, "Give me a dollar to go to New York, and you'll be free of me." So he did. Rob got a job sweeping out an office, and as you know, got his own banking and investing business, Sid wanted the navy, and "retrieved" the Henry reputation by graduating second in his class and becoming National Fencing Champion. He went on to M.I.T. and then retired and went into business as maritime finance consultant, at one time president of Matson Lines. Reg, not prepared for anything, but crazy for one of the services, worked for Rob for a while but was then to old for an appointment so only opening was a line. He chose medicine and the older boys clubbed together and put him through U. of Virginia then medical school, and he got into the Navy, served with marine corps. not too hot as a practising doctor, but good on public health. Laid out San Juan System. They all married their own kind of people and never any question about their tastes or how they behaved. They had the advantage while young of visiting us in vacations and going for a while in the summers to Lake George where their father was commodore of Lake George Yachting Club where they met nice girls and were a part in the regattas. Will married May Du Bignon of Atlanta. He became Supt of Eastern Lines of Penn. R.R. Jim married Mary McLaughry from Leavenworth. Her father was a prison authority and introduced thumb printing to U.S. Rob married Jean Tolar, Bay Ridge, they lived at St. John's Place Brooklyn, where I used to visit them. I was bridesmaid at their wedding while I was at Oldfields. The "Mister" announced his engagement at Rob's wedding to Margaret, 50 years younger the he. They were married nine years. My father's only remark was she got more out of him than his sister ever did. But he left nearly nothing and the boys took care of her until she died. You know about Reg and Frank.

COFFIN

The Coffin geneology is pretty complete and is on record for us with the Colonial Dames. Reg also had it where it interlocked with us. He also had what was known of the Anderson connection. My mother was Eleanor Calder Coffin, her mother Mary Calder Cartwright. (I think her mother was Starbuck, my grandmother). She married George William Coffin, Nantucket, who was brought up by aunt and uncle, his parents dead. He was the first of the sea-going Coffins who went into the U.S. Navy, graduated early (from Naval Academy) because of Civil War held Fort Fisher (at age 21) until Fort Sumter was taken, wounded in leg, promoted to Lt. Cmdr. went to Russia and Admiral Farragut - that's why my mother was called Lena. Volunteered for Greely Relief Expedition and had command of the "Alert" - one of the three ships commanded by Admiral Schley. He stood in the crow's nest 72 hours and got his leg frozen where it had been wounded. After return was offered head of navigation but turned it down and took the Lighthouse Service because, I think, it kept him near home, and my grandmother was ill. The Lighthouse Service was then under the Navy. After her death, he went to sea, on U.S.S. Charleston to the Far East. plotted Manila Bay (then Spanish) then sent plans to Admiral Dewey (his roommate at Annapolis) who had never been there, and who used them in battle of Manilla Bay. He retired in 1896, went to Yokohama with us, went back to active duty during war 1899, but it was too much for him, died in Yokohama in 1900. Until his death I knew him better than I knew my father, and was with him a great deal. He was wonderful.


WHERE WE WERE AND PROBABLE DATES - PROBABLY ACCURATE FROM THE SAME LETTER
(see above)

I was born May 2, 1887, in New Brighton Staten Island. My father was at sea at the time and probably my grandfather also because I have never found any allusion to him at the time. Evidently my grandmother and mother went to Staten Island because of my father's connections, though by that time his immediate family was all dead. Aunt Hattie Irving was there however, taking care of Frank who was three and Reg, six. Reg was the one able to testify as to my birth and christening when I applied for a passport since he remimbered being at the christening and its being in a house with the bishop in charge which it made is difficult to find a record in a parish church. The local minister of the community where the house was, was not New Brighton. Aunt Hattie was my godmother. I don't know when my grandparents moved to Washington to 2023 R St. but that's where we all were until I was about four years old whn the 19th St. house was built. Eleanor was born in the R St. house Aug. 3rd, 1890. My grandfather was then head of the Light House Service, then under the Navy Dept.
My parents built the 19th St. house when Eleanor was about 18 months old. My grandmother must have given them most of the money from a small legacy because she stipulated that the house should never be sold unless it was replaced by another. The idea in those days being a house was the only safeguard for a widow who could always take boarders. They had seen to many destitute Navy widows. My grandparents were young themselves, my grandmother scarcely 40, Nana. My father was seventeen years older than my mother.
We lived at 1628 19th St. until my father was ordered to Yokohama in 1897. He was attached to the Naval Dispensary for part of the time but had a quite extensive private practice which they could at that time, and a reputation as a diagnosticion. The latter part of the time was his sea duty, attached to U.S.S. (unable to fully decipher the name of the ship appears like Archlintrite), I think a gunboat, at the disposal of the president because on one cruise the Chinese ammbassador was aboard with the President - the famous Li Huong Chang (not sure of this spelling). So the ship was often at the navy yard. I remember going there to see the ship once, but I don't remember the ship, just going. My father while ashore on Dispensary duty had a horse and a closed sort of vehicle, not a buggy, and a colored driver named Spencer.
My grandmother died in 1893. My grandfather immediately applied fo sea duty and went to Japan and the Philippines on U.S.S. Charleston as Captain It was there he mapped Manila Bay which afterwards served Admiral Dewey when he took Manila in the Spanish American War. My grandfather never made admiral. He had been ordered to South America right after having had his leg frozen on the Arctic Expedition to rescue General Greely and developed Bright's disease which it affected his heart, and he retired in 1895 or 6 and lived with us at 1628 19th Street while my father was at sea, when we all went to Yokohama on October 7, 1897. My father preceded us in August and was there to meet us. We were in Yokohama at the Naval Hospital from Nov. 1897 (it took us a month to get there from Washington, 5 days train, a stop in San Francisco, 18 days by P & O Steamer ) to Oct. 1900. It looked like a split in the family then. My grandfather had died 10 months previously and had evidently left money to my mother to take me to Europe to school, ( I was always his "pearl of pride" and had spent much of my childhood with them, and in Yokohama in his separate little house on the Bluff where he had a "boy", a victoria to ride in, and two fox terriers, Chubbie and Gus.) Anyway my mother and I took the N.G. Lloyd Sachsen steamer for Europe and my father took Eleanor to U.S. and left her with Aunt Hattie and Frank in New Brighton until my mother had found the Paris school for me, and rejoined them.
Polly Condis Smith, sister of Mrs. Albert Key. Key was in the Embassy at Tokyo. Another sister was Mrs. Leonard Wood, Governor of Philippines after Spanish American War. Polly had just survived the Boxer Rebellion in Peking and was quite famous for her maintenance work during the siege. She travelled with mother and me to Paris and I shared a stateroom with her on N. G. Lloyd Oldenburg in the Mediterranean after our two weeks in Cairo. She was only 23. She left us in Paris to get married to Richard Hooker, Marine Corps. Needless to say I gleamed an awful lot about her experience in Peking. Most of the people I knew anyway as they had passed through Yokohama on their way.
I was in the Paris school from December 1900 until August 1901 when mother came over to see me and spend a month at St Marguerite in Brittany with some friends she had known in Japan-the Wilders from Honolulu. We were in Hotel de la Plage, they in a cottage. Eleanor had been left with Mrs Knox and Marguerite to go to Lake George. But I was ill- headache, sort of a nervous breakdown and she brought me home instead. My father was again at sea and the 19th Street house rented, so we had an appartment at the Portner,15th and U Street. I was in bed most of the year, until I was 15. Eleanor went to the Miss Dorsey's School where I went after a while. It was then I got to know Grace Allen and Alice Goodwin and Constance Hoyt,sister of Elinor Hoyt Wylie who afterwards married William Rose Benet. Also Mary Howry who now lives in Jamestown, and other native Washington young and Army and Navy girls. This was a few years before the rival school of Holton-Arms. I only went spasmodically until I went to Oldfields in 1905.
My father still at sea, Eleanor and I went to Oldfields in October 1905. Rob Henry was married late October and we went to Bayridge, Brooklyn for the wedding. I was bridesmaid. The winter of 1905-6 Eleanor and I were at Oldfields and my father back, a house was rented for the summer on DeSales Street opposite the convent which was later torn down to make the Mayflower Hotel. Blanche Brune (VanDusen) stayed with us,also Frank Henry. In October, my father was ordered to the Mare Island Navy Yard, and we left for California. It was a lovely overland train trip. I rembered it from the one we had taken in 1897. Not very different. We had drawing rooms both times.
We got the quarters on Mare Island at a beautiful time of year. I loved the eucalyptus and hedge of nasturtiums. Big comfortable house. Sid Henry had been ordered there after leaving MIT in the Construction Corps. They were building a ship. Captain of the Yard was his "bete noir". It was there he met Julia Persons whose father was a Doctor attached to the Marine Barracks. My father had the Naval Dispensary of the Yard. Married June 1908.
We were at Mare Island from October 1905 to February 1908-at least the family was. I left in May 1908 to go to Minneapolis to visit Blanche who had married George VanDusen and was expecting Georgie, who showed up in August. I travelled from San Francisco to Chicago in the private car of Mr. Hobart Moore who was President of the Rock Island Railroad. Lucy Powell was Mrs. Moore's friend and sort of general companion as Mr. Moore was an invalid. He never spoke but wanted to play bridge all the time. Lucy had been a close friend of mother's since Yokohama days. The Moores took me along as her friend and to make a fourth for bridge. I played all the way from San Francisco to Chicago and never played again. The Moore's only child, Than, had died at 25 after a wild life. He had been married to a darling girl, Helen Fargo, who had a hard time with him. He was of the era when rich young men gave parties for the Flora Dora Chorus and he presented each one with a diamond bracelet. The Moores were sunk. The private car was named Thanis after him. I left them at Chicago and took the train on to Minneapolis. I left there and went to stay with Jim and Mary Henry and Betty, then four, at Ft Snelling across the river from St Paul. It was certainly a contrast to the VanDusens at Lake Minnetoka. Jim was a 1st Lt in the 4th Cavalry by then. It was a new experience for me Army life. I didn't like it, but enjoyed the visit and Jim. From there, in August, I went to Colombus Ohio to visit Will and May Henry. Billy was three months old. With them I went to Lake George where mother and Eleanor came. We were there until late September.
My father was ordered to Annapolis from Mare Island. The Naval Hospital was being built. He supervised the finishing and got it started. He was the first one to try out women nurses in the Navy. Before he got to Annapolis we three stayed at Carvel Hall but eventually rented the Colihan House 61 College Avenue opposite St John's College Campus. I liked the Annapolis years, but I was too old for the midshipmen. Eleanor was just right for it. I had had the most glamorous of social life then extant in San Francisco as my mother's happiest young years had been spent there and her friends married with children my age and up in the world. I had missed the Great White Fleet as it engulfed Mare Island and gave Eleanor and FlorenceTurner such heavy Navy life, but I didn't mind that. I was never too much for the Navy. In Annapolis I had individual friends of both Midshipmen and Officers, but as always it was Eleanor who appealed to them first, being so attractive and gay. After a while certain of them settled down to both of us, some to me, but it was, except in afew cases always Eleanor first. Anyway, I hated the hops. I wanted still to study art, which I couldn't do at Mare Island. I went up to Baltimore twice a week to private lessons from Miss. Haycroft who had been a pupil of (William) Morris in London. She taught crafts and design. I remember her first surprised remark to her assistant-"Why, this girl can draw !!". She explained that most who came to study design had no idea of drawing or use of mediums. Anyway that's what I was more interested in. The first summer there we took a cottage at Bolton Landing, Lake George, an improvement on Hague. The next summer I went to England with the Frys to visit Frances Bright. I came back from a wonderful trip and stay in England with the Brights in Rochdale Lancashire, and then at the Mitchells. Sir William was then President of Shell Oil, they had been friends of us and the Frys in Yokohama. Winnie Mitchell was one of my friends there. They had a big Elizabethan place called Tudor Hall with moat, deer park and all the appurtenances. I got back in October, midst of Hudson-Fulton celebration 1909. Rush Fay had graduated in mid summer,and he and Eleanor were engaged. I am wrong about when we took the cottage at Bolton. Not that first summer-it was the second summer, because Rush got leave from his first cruise and came to Bolton for his two weeks. Also, Bolivar Mead who graduated in 1910. So Bolton was 1910. The spring of 1911 we went to Washington, my father retired and was put on a Naval Examining Board which kept him busy. We were back at 1628 19th Street and they did over a lot of the house. After that for me it was Washington social life. I saw more of Phil who was then working on sidewalks, and Jerry Creighton just back from Heidelberg-an odd one, but we got on beautifully, Harriet Bayne whom I'd known so long anyway, and now engaged to Guy Castle who had been at Mare Island and at that time devoted to Florence. I was taken for a debutante and thrown in with that group, as Eleanor and Rush were married in May 1912 and I was the one home. It was gay and I enjoyed a lot of it but a lot was an awful bore, especially the calling and the big balls. My father being looked upon as "moneyed" sort of put us in a different bracket. Probably his entire entire income was not over $10,000 but most people had 5 or 6. The summer after Eleanor was married, I went to Narragansett with Mrs Bayne and Harriot and Louise. I roomed with Harriot. It was awfully different then. Very gay, casino, beach wide open, and board walk like Atlantic City. That winter I got the measles. All the servants left. I was very sick. Afterwards for a change Mother and I went to New Orleans and there I had a wonderful time. Hugh Aiken's brother Gayle and I hit it off right away and I did the Mardi Gras with him. Also some Navy men whom I had known were on a ship in port, and another man, a student at some import business gave me some parties and a very good time. The Dene's, Charles and Alphonse did a lot for us in the old New Orleans line of native life. They had been agents for my father's real estate there for a hundred years. That Washington era took us up to the summer of 1914 when my parents went to England as their 25th Anniversary celebration and got caught in a war. I was at Newport with Eleanor at a boarding house on K Street. Rush was Captain of a submarine in Newport. That was when he got facial paralysis. Back in Washington that winter I went to New York to study art at the Women's School of Fine and Applied Art on Lexington Avenue at 4th. The first winter I boarded around, had a lot of appendicitis pain and finally had an operation in the spring. The next winter I lived mostly with the Van Vechten Olcotts on 72d Street and Central Park West. It was another different experience. He was a congressman from New York and she was the daughter of the Hoffman House Hoffmans. Lots of money. Uncle Van was a friend of my father from the Staten Island days.
In l9l5 my family built the house at Wardour on the 2 acre lot they bought when we lived in Annapolis. The idea was looking toward retirement and my mother was taken with the idea of a garden, and perhaps two riding horses. The place was just being opened up. The Valiants (Rush's sister Florence) bought a big lot on the creek side, the Doyens (sister Claude) another, and various other people. Turned out to be not too congenial after some years. It was a beautiful fair-sized southern sort of house. T. J. D. Fuller, architect. That was the year I had appendicitis. In the summer while it was building after I got strong enough, my mother and I went west. She to the Expo at San Francisco, while I stopped off with Blanche at Lake Minnetonka. That was the summer Tracy came there and in the fall had his house party at Great Lakes.
My father fell into the Wardour idea but it never worked for him. He was a scholar and a student but no gardener . Mother loved it. There was a lovely garden and they had a sleeping porch which they liked. Rush was ordered to Annapolis so they were there a lot, and finally lived there until it was sold when they went to China. My father was there less than a year being ordered back to duty in Philadelphia. The Washington House was rented and finally sold (for $l2,000, imagine). I never liked Wardour- climate, garden or people. You could take the Short Line car to Baltimore or into Annapolis, but I only liked it when people came to see us which many did and it broke the time I was there. Sarah, who worked for us and came out from Camp Mead every day was the best thing about it.Somewhere is the paper I wrote for The Monday Evening Club called "Don't Rent-Buy" which has a lot of Wardour in it.
The Alcotts were wonderful to me. I returned to art school , but in spite of Aunt Lolly trying to get me interested in various young men, especially one Ralph Allen who lived there most of the time. I was taken up with, or by, Tracy McCauley, a classmate of Rush's, who was in command of a torpedo destroyer at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He was from Evanston, Illinois, apparantly the heir of all the McCauleys. For the legend was, he never drew his pay. Anyway, I saw every play in New York, and ate at every place like Delmonico's and the old Waldorf. Whenever I wasn't with him I waited up for Uncle Van and Aunt Lolly who were always out themselves and would bring home guests, so I was always up and evening-dressed until about two. Then I went to went to school where I stood up for 8 hours a day. It was strenuous and I was pretty tired. In February I moved to the Kindergarden Students Residence on 40th St. and Lexington Ave. where I knew Helen Large and Beatrice Allen.That summer I went out to Lake Minnetonka to stay with Blance in their new house. Tracy came there and before going back to Washington and New York I went to visit him on a trumped up houseparty at his quarters at Great Lakes, his older sister chaperoning. It was sort of a climax but I could see it was not for me.I went back to art school and took illustrating as by that time as by that time I had some things published and wanted to illustrate.I won a scholarship, which was embarrassing because it was given by a Staten Island Roosevelt, a friend of my father's and I had to write and thank him without divulging my relationship and the un-necessity for help. It got to be l9l7 and war. My father went back on active duty at Medico-Clinurgical Hospital in Philadelphia. I graduated from school amd went there too.The first winter at 42nd and Chestnut St. in Dr. Hughes' house. Second winter, Delancey. By that time I was married.

NOTE:
Several poems by Dorothy Morgan Anderson are entered in this computer program under Phyllis Hoge, her daughter, because of lack of space here.

This poem was written by DAH and published in The New York Times Sept. 20, 1957.
"TORTOISE"

Box-like, withdrawn, his checkered
shell worn thin,
His wrinkled eyes from which
strange wisdom peers,
Lost now in time, since his dim
origin
In some far pool, he lives his end-
less years.
The seasons scarcely mark his
lingering;
The cool environment of gentle
snow,
The soft moist earth of each re-
turning spring,
THe summer solitude where berries
grow.
No pull of tide, no warmth of sun,
no distance
Call him to venture from this nar-
row space;
Sufficient this for limitless exist-
ence-
A still, calm life, a last abiding
place.


Notes for PHILIP BARLOW HOGE:
Born at 1402 15TH St NW Wash DC Attending Physician Dr Johnson
1908 - Graduate of Cornell
1913-1914 Pres Hoge & Leubkert (Sidewalk Contractors) Wash DC

US Army IST LT Corps of Engineers 1917,Captain, Major, Construction Div QM Corps 1918

The following is a letter written by Dorthy Anderson Hoge, wife of Philip Barlow Hoge, between 1965-1970.

Hoge
Spencer (Dickinson) has the Hoge family tree rolled up somewhere but it's hard to discipher and doesn't go as far as our generation anyway. The original Hoge came to this county on one of the early pioneer ships landing at Perth Amboy. On the ship was a Barbara Hume (ship's romance). They married and started the long line of sturdy progressive Quakers. One descendent went to Seattle, one to middle west, one was the Presbyterian minister who "flourished" in NY (xx son) met in Coconut Grove(FL) Doctor, ( I think) Peyton, evidently wealthy and children married abroad. Phil's family among others settled as land owning farmers in Virginia, the famous Loudoun County, Quakers. Phil's father had brothers; Isaac, remained a farmer; Lewis, married cousin Rachel - she the business woman, he the intellectual. James, the eldest, he and Phil's father Willy finally left Virginia, went into business in Washington, grain elevator, & supply. James was Clark's (Norris of Chicago) father, also Julia's.

Phil's father married Mary Stearns, whose mother was the Lee connection, I think her name was Harriet. Another sister Josie married Johns Hopkin's brother. Phyllis (Hoge) has her picture. One was married to Uncle Will Hastings. Stearns was an Episcopal minister from upper New York. This was during the civil war and they were very poor, but certainly had great taste and education of the sort acquired from books, not schooling. I don't know where she and Willy Hoge met but I think at the Hopkin's in Baltimore. We had mutual cousins there.

The Hoge children were Nan, Rachel, Will, Phil, Mary, Margaret, Barbara. Nan's children are Fred Savage Jr., Dorothy Oudin, Nan & Rachel married brothers - Fred, and Frank (Savage). Rachel's only child - Anne Pettit. Will's - are Bill, Mary Gleysteen, and Betsy, now Diamond. Mary married Murdock Norris. Mary's children are Anne Poole, Alan, and Polly - Polly married John Rulon-Miller. Margaret married J. Nicholas Brewster, had daughter Peggy. Barbara married Laurence Stickney whom she met visiting Rachel Savage in St. Paul. He died and she married Hugh Blair Grigsby Galt (no children from either marriage).

Janet Bangs' mother was a Hoge from Loudoun Co, first cousin of the Willy Hoges. She married Charles Norris (no relation to Murdock Norris) from the wide farm land in Illinois, raised horses and cattle. The miniature that Eleanor Dickinson has is Janet Bangs' mother. She kept a fascinating diary which I read to Janet the last time I was there, covered her engagement, wedding and early married life in the big household she went to. It was hard to read, I'm afraid it's lost. There are a great many legends of the Hoge connection in the middle west who used to come and visit the Washington Hoges. They were always welcome. One was Aunt Fred, married a one time mayor of Chicago - a more or less no-good and detereriorated, but Aunt Fred was something. On the spread out prairie she decided it was lovely for people so posted a notice in the store post office of a 4th of July picnic, for everybody to come with family and food in wagons to certain grove. Everybody came. There were over a hundred families. She never got enough ice cream so on one visit Mr. Hoge ordered two gallons and she ate through it on her visit. Another odd one was cousin Debbie whose mission in life was to visit, preach to, and convert prisoners, so wouldn't do anything else on her visit but visit Washington prisoners. On his mother's side,(the Lee side), were Aunt Minnie and Aunt Jinny in the old house in Alexandria, the ones whose servants sold off the downstairs furniture. They let down the front door key on a string so Mrs H and Phil could come in. Senator Smoot bought the house. It's now government owned.

As to Phil and me, I had a friend at Miss Dorsey's school where I went for a year after I came back to Washington from Paris having spent a year out of school with nervous headaches. She was Grace Allen.(Years later around 1975 when Grace, who never married, was living in a nursing home in Ridgewood, N. J. having been put there by a nephew, she was visited by Dorothy Hoge and her daughter, Langley Hoge Kenzie. By this time they were both very old, and Grace's memory had partly gone. Grace asked Dorothy whatever happened to Phil Hoge? And Dorothy answered, " I married him", They were both crying.) She knew other Army girls and some Navy who all went to Miss Haxall's dancing class at Rauscher's. The Hoges had sent Mary and Phil. They went to public high school. Phil got to know the young group and stuck with them. The girls drifted off and went to boarding school, but I wouldn't go to the dancing class (like the fortnightlys in Elizabeth) but I got to know the group through Grace. I went with her and a group to the High School Cadet Training Corps Graduation contest where Phil's company (he was captain) won the flag. Great occasion. He had worked it all out on paper first. Grace thought he was a "rough diamond" preferred some others who seemed to me the walking disaster types. Of course I had had an awful lot of experience of people by the time I was fifteen. Phil was eighteen then, just plain himself. We went on long walks (whole group) though Rock Creek Park, on lots of Sundays, played ping pong at various houses, tennis on somebodys fixed up lot on P Street and went to matinees, very good stock companies during the summer. Mostly Phil and I did that alone, got seats in the last row and sat on the back, with our feet in the seats. The theater served paper cups of sherbet between the acts, 25 cents an afternoon. They all went off to college in the fall but we continued more or less though the next few years holidays and Phil and I kept up a correspondence always. He never talked about his family. We were of different groups. It was years before I knew he had a brother or sister besides Mary and Margaret.

Later as I grew to know Phil's people and background better there were things almost legendary that fascinated me, being so different from anything that had ever touched my life. The idea of his father and uncle the two oldest of a Quaker farm family after the civil war, walking from Lynchburg or Warrenton all the way to Providence to go to Brown, picking up rides along the way. Their mother and aunt and other children ran the farm. Somehow they were never stuck, they were all educated and managed to visit relatives as far as Illinois. A tradition. The middle westerners all visited the Hoges in Washington and there were always extras in the house. Phil's father did the marketing. He'd go out, pick up a little colored boy somewhere to carry the basket, and go to the old P St. market and load up. A great plenty of the best plain food which Mrs Hoge doled out each day from locked store room. They had a smoke house in the back yard. When Phil worked for his father after leaving college he'd go out about 6:00 to get things started, return to an assembled enormous hot breakfast. During their childhood when Mr Hoge and Uncle James made money, they bought land outside of Washington called Washington View where they could take all the children in the summers, orchard, fresh vegetables, horse & buggy, preserving. Probably they all got interested in land development there. Rachel & Phil were the only ones who wanted to go to college. Rachel afterwards taught a few years in the public school. I gathered not too successfully, but always enthusiastically. An arranger whose plans didn't always work out. Nan was the social one and Washington being small and they being what used to be called "cave Dwellers", long time settlers not congress or diplomats - or service, all knew each other. One of Nan's best friends was Lucy Bayne Theall.


POEMS BY P. B. HOGE:

"THE ROOSTER BIRD"

The silliest sound I've ever heard
Is that made by the rooster bird.
The song that's sung by Mister Cock
of Leghorn breed or Plymouth Rock,
Rhode Island Red or Dominick,
Or any other brand of chick
Though oft called a "cock a doodle do",
The appelation is not true.
The voice that's raised by Chantieler,
That rends the early morning air
Sounds most absurd you will ever hear,
For what he says is "Urk uh urr".

"GEESE"

Geese sure do make an awful squawk
When they just talk and talk and talk.
But warm and gentle rain in spring
Will make them sing and sing and sing.
They lift their beaks, their necks they crane,
The silly creatures love the rain.
They seem to reach the heights of bliss
That lovers reach when lovers kiss.
I love to watch them in the Spring,
To hear them sing and sing and sing.

CORRECTED VERSION & NEW TITLE

"GOOSES"

When goose to goose essays to talk
The sound you hear is just a squawk
But sometimes when it rains in Spring
Just listen and you'll hear them sing
With beaks upraised and neck a craning
They make sweet music when it's raining
And seem to reach the heights of bliss
That lovers reach when lovers kiss
When falls the gentle rain in spring
O' then's the time the gooses sing


"THE SKUNK"

Oft have I thunk and thunk and thunk,
What kind of noise is made by skunk?
I never yet have heard his voice,
As I keep far from him by choice.
No doubt he'd sound verbose enough,
Did I dare listen close enough.
His fur is nice with lovely marking,
But I have never heard him barking.
He looks a handsome little creature,
But looks are not his leading feature.
The skunk is just an awful smeller,
Tho' noiseless he's a noisome feller.
He may be silent, but I think
Instead of voice he's got a stink.

This was a talk given to the Monday Evening Club, in Elizabeth, NJ at the house of P. B. Hoge, about 1940 - after which Hoge asked lawyer friend in the audience group - (Mr. Bart Woodruff) to come up and present him with award for Liars Club - "Liar of the Year" or some such.

In the summer of 1906 - during school vacation, I got a job as roadman in a surveying part on the Northern Pacific Railroad in western Montana. As I had to pay my own way as far as Livingston, Montana, where I joined the party, I rode in a coach. From there on, we were carried free, but as we were not very high-priced workers we all rode in coaches the rest of the way. My pay was the magnificent sum of $50.00 a month - board and lodging free. This is twice the amount I had gotten as axeman 4 years previously in another survey party.

Our first location was Bonver, Montana a small village at the foot of a mountain. The village itself was dwarfed by a huge sawmill plant of the Big Blackfoot Milling Company. I never saw as much lumber in one place in my life - before or since - and I suspect the forests in that location were being rapidly denuded as this was before the days of serious forest conservation.

For the first week or ten days we lived in style, sleeping and getting our meals in the hotel in Bonver, until some thrifty soul in the home office must have decided that such treatment was too fancy for a field party. So two much-used and rather drafty box cars (of the type familiarly known as side-door Pullmans) were rolled in on a side track and fitted with wooden bunks, and arrangements made with a local boarding house to feed us.

We were given blankets, but anything else we had to get for ourselves. A box car properly fitted up is not an uncomfortable place to live - and as there were only 6 or 8 men in our car - a double decker bunk in each corner - it wasn't too bad. The only trouble was during the first night. What the car had been used for previously I do not know, but it looked as though some cattle might have been in there for a while. At any rate, one of the boys was given the job of cleaning it out - and he did - with a vengeance. He used a shovel and broom and then to make sure all was sanitary he sprinkled chloride of lime around generously - and then water to lay the dust. I am not sure of my chemistry, as it has been a long time since I have had anything to do with the subjuct, but I think when you mix chloride of lime and water you get chlorine gas. At any rate, whatever it was, I was in a lower bunk in one corner - with a blanket and no mattress and I breathed the awful stuff all night long - and shivered - and I even shivered the next day in the warm sunshine, so the party chief sent me to the Company hospital in Missonla - just a few miles down the railroad. I will never forget the perfectly delightful feeling of setting into the hospital cot in a warm room after a good hot bath. I must have picked up a bug along with the chlorine, as I was off the job for about 2 weeks with the flu - except we called it the grippe then.

I would like to say something here - parenthetically - a few side remarks. Remember, these were the days before employee insurance of any kind - when men were sick or injured on the job and had to get along as best they could until they could work again and get back on the payroll. The N.P.R.R. must have had this hospital in operation for some years. The buildings were not new, there was a staff of doctors and nurses and 30 or 40 beds - 20 or 25 were occupied by patients while I was there. The company gave complete medical and hospital care and paid wages, too - not from any paternalistic or philanthropical idea, but purely from intelligent self interest. They had probably learned by experience that it was cheaper and more satisfactory to get experienced men back on the job quickly than to hire new untried men. The towns were quite far apart and the country thinly settled. So far as I know they ran the only hospital in Missonla. Other railroads there must have done the same thing, because a brother-in-law of mine - a doctor living in St. Paul, Minnesota was a railroad doctor for some years as a young man.

I bought a mattress in Missonla to take back with me. The other boys had done the same. No use not being comfortable. We settled down to the routine of surveying.

The Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad (better known simply as the Milwaukee) had decided to extend its rail to the Pacific Coast and had surveying parties in to locate a line. The Northern Pacific didn't like that idea much and had put our party in the field in what they claimed was a desire to shorten their line and eliminate steep grades - no doubt true - but it was also on attempt to put a crimp in the Milwaukee plans and get in ahead of them using up the best locations whereever posible. Our chief of party always pulled up whatever Milwaukee stakes he found and threw them away - a nice friendly gesture. However, it didn't stop the Milwaukee at any rate. As far as I know they not only reached the coast, but they electrified their lines - if not all the way - at least over the mountains. Maybe somebody here knows better about that than I do as I haven't been that far west again for over 50 years.

I don't know what is the best kind of job for a young man to have, but that summer was a pleasant and healthful experience. A great deal of walking, some trees to cut down, some brambles to slash through, swamps to muck through and a swift river to ford occasionally.

The river - called the Hellgate then - but now according to the map by the much more dignified and proper name of Clark River - was not large nor very deep - but very swift and with many rapids. In many places it was possible to wade it in perfect safety - in fact it was a relief to get in the water, as the days were clear, hot and dry - so dry in fact that I have been wet and dried off completely 3 times in one day - that means clothes, shoes and all - as you had to ford the river as you were.

There was one place we wanted to cross and started ont confidently enough but as the water got deeper and we saw the rapids not far down the river - each one of us would turn back - and someone else watching from the shore - from which point it looked so easy - would try it a bit farther and then turn back again. I made several false starts losing my nerve each time and finally getting to where the water started getting shallow again beyond the middle of the river and had just started up the slope when the current got me. I swam back for the shore I had feft and was grabbed as I swept by. I learned one thing from that experience. I was scared to death wading that river and remembering the rapids below but once I was off my feet I was so busy swimming back to the shore it never occured to me to be frightened. Anticipation is often worse than actuality.

Our party consisted of the chief - named Heckman - and about 10 men. Heckman, as I remember, was a cynical man, but probably a good man on location surveys. I guess he knew his business. Woody, the transit man was a morose individual. Ernie was a good man who did his job - I have forgotten what his duties were - and minded his own business. Ed was the level man - my boss - a moody individual. The thing that I remember best about him was when I was slowly plowing knee deep in the muck of a drying up swamp and Ed at the surveying level on dry ground in the shade of a tree and cursing me for being so slow - and with each sloggy step I was getting madder and madder.

Cupid was a gay pleasant little man about 35 years old - I don't remember what his duties were, but it was pleasant to have him around. Murphy the axeman was a nice young Irish lad almost 18. Slim was a big pleasant young man named Claude Averill - but who was always addressed as "you big Swede you." He was head chairman or tapeman - and M.J. Harrison was rear tapeman.

M.J. Harrison - the last on the list - was a - well it wouldn't be polite to say what he was - but that is what he was. He was a red haired tough little runt. I do not know what kind of work he was best fitted for but he had been many things during his checkered career. He had been a bar tender, a hack driver, a jockey (disqualified for some kind of crooked work, though he always claimed he was railroaded out of the job.) He had an unlimited found of experiences if one believed what he said. "did I ever tell you about the time I joined the Salvation Army." or "That reminds me of the time." No matter what anybody else had done, Harrison could go him one better. The chief of the party said, "I don't know what his birth record shows, but if Harrison is telling the truth he is at least 70 years old. Nobody could have done all of the things he claimed to have done in 30 years of life. There wouldn't have been time.

He told us once that he had a girl in a small town, but had left the town. he went back to the town about 3 years later and went to see his girl friend. "She had a small red headed brat she was trying to teach to call me "Papa". I left that town again, and I ain't going thru anymore."

We asked him often what "M.J." stood for but he would never tell. "Don't nobody know but me and my mother. A police judge asked me that once, and that's what I told him - and I ain't told nobody - then or since".

He had a scar on his leg where somebody had knifed him. He was quite peeved about that. "I shot at the so-and-so," he said. "Wish I had killed him."

After one payday he spent the night in the back room of the bar gambling - and got cleaned out, but he wasn't mad at the man who got his money. He was mad at the Northern Pacific Railroad because he had worked for a whole month getting tired and wet and had nothing to show for it.

Generally every Saturday night the whole gang would take the train free ride for employees - and go to Missonla or Butte for a big night - and they usually had one - according to their stories when they got back. No, I never went along, maybe I was just unsociable. I do not pretend to be any saint, but to tell the truth raising that particular kind of hell never appealed to me. It would bore me to death. I could never see any percentage in getting drunk. Just never wanted to.

On one of these trips Harrison went with the gang but was missing on the return trip. The others guessed he was in jail. Two days later he was back. Hopped a freight train for transportation. The very first thing he went up to Slim "the big Swede" - and said "I licked a man a heap bigger than you. I socked him with a billard cue, and the blankity blank cops put me in jail.

One Saturday night the whole gang pulled out as usual - Harrison with them. This time instead of being late he was back early. He walked in early Sunday morning - quite mad. It seems he had gotten into an argument and a fight on the train and the conductor put him off at some small station. He beat his way back on a freight but he didn't know what to do with himself in camp - and as usual he was a pest.

Sometime during the morning he discovered fishing gear belonging to one of the other men and suggested fishing. That looked like a good idea as the stream about two miles away was loaded with fish and very little skill was needed to catch them. So we went and caught some and built a fire, cooked and ate them.

There was still a lot of the day left - and it was warm. We took off our clothes and washed them in the stream as we often did and hung them up on tree branches a short distance away on the hillside on the edge of the woods to dry and then went back for a swim. We often did this if we got a chance. The hot sun dried everything in half and hour.

Harrison, who couldn't swim much anyway and was never satisfied to stay at anything very long, decided he had had enough of the water and went up to get dressed.

A little later I came out to do the same but he started throwing rocks at me to keep me from getting my clothes. His idea was to keep me naked for a while. I suppose if he had thought of it sooner he would have grabbed my clothes before I could get them and make me walk the 2 miles back to camp naked. It would have been a good joke at that - I am bound to admit now - though I wouldn't have thought so then.

At any rate Mr. Harrison was going to have his fun for awhile. I had to duck behind a tree to escape his barrage of stones and every attempt to reach my clothes brought more stones. There were no rocks near my tree and I was getting pretty well fed up with the nonsence - when I saw a short chunky stick nearby. I make a quick dash and got it fighting on some sort of delaying action so I could reach my clothes.

Realizing that there were no stones where I was he got a little bolder and nearer - and then I fired the stick at him. It never touched him but it disconcerted him and he dodged and ran back - and I heard him yell. I make a break and dashed out got my clothes and moved out of his neighborhood and got dressed - expecting him to appear any minute.

I couldn't see him anywhere or hear him either and I looked around expecting him from another quarter, as I was sure he was cooking up some sort of devilment. Finally, I called him to come along and go back to camp. No response. Then I got curious and circled around and approached the place where he had been. There was a slight depression in the ground, loose stones lying around, and a mound of dirt beside it which had not been visible from where I had been. When I got closer I discovered that the depression was the edge of a hole. It looked like an abandoned mine shaft. We occasionally ran across them - where a prospector had made a try for one and given up when the hole showed no promise.

Up until then I hadn't worried much about Harrison. I had thought he had just gone back in the woods - or even back to camp. But when I saw that hole I got scared - real scared. I couldn't see very far down the hole. Too dark, so I threw a lighted match down but of course it went out right away. I was getting a bit frantic. I wanted to see the bottom of that hole. Finally I found a dried pine branch, lighted it and tossed it down. I never saw the bottom - but I saw water about 25 feet down - and I saw something else. I saw a foot and part of a leg sticking out of the water at an angle and it was not moving.

I rushed around to see if I couldn't find some way of getting down. I found a small tree blown over, but it was much too short. I didn't have an axe - only a pocket knife. there just wasn't anyway of getting down with any assurance of being able to get out again. I started to leave several times, to get help. I was afraid not to go and then afraid to go. I was much confused.

Time was passing. Harrison had been in there at least half an hour before I discovered him and by the time I had to abandon any idea of reaching him over two hours had gone by. I didn't know what to do. I just quit then and did some tall thinking.
The normal thing is to try to find help and somebody to report the accident to and explain what happened. There was no doubt that Harrison was gone. He had probably struck his head and been stunned and drowned. I tried to compose myself the best I could and think what was best to do - and I thought the thing through for a long time. I did some tall thinking pro and con.

As I saw it Harrison had left with the rest of the crowd for Butte, and when he was put off the train the rest had gone on. Nobody had seen him on the freight he took back to camp as he had just been chased off one before that and made sure he would not be chased off again so kept well out of sight.

Nobody had been around when he got back to camp. Except for the 2 of us the place was utterly deserted. The country was rather wild and we had not seen anyone when we left camp or on the walk to the river.

I figured when the rest of the croud came back they would tell about his being put off the train - and wonder when he would be back. If he didn't come back they might talk about it for a few days and decide he had just quit. The month had just ended and everybody had been paid to date - so if he didn't come back he would be taken off the payroll - and they wouldn't expect him to come to collect any more money because none would be due to him.

He had threatened to quit plenty of times and they would probably decide he had finally done so - and he would pass out of mind except for the tall tales about him. That is the way I reasoned it out. The rest of the outfit would easily explain Harrison's disappearance to their own satisfaction.

What about my side of it. Harrison was gone. There wasn't any doubt about it. If I reported exactly what had happened would I be believed? Would any of our ??? camp ??? be made much of by the local authorities? Of course I had some responsiblity but he had really brought it on himself and much as I regretted the outcome there was nothing I could do now.

I was due back in college in less than a month. Any investigation would cause untold delay regardless of the outcome. It would certainly upset my parents who were getting along in years - especially my mother.

They say an honest confession is good for the soul. Is it? Would it have done any good now?

I finally decided the best thing to do was to keep quiet so I did.

I tossed as many dead pine branches as I could collect down the hole and pushed a few large rocks in on top, and left - and got back to camp and tried to get myself composed. The boys got back that night. I didn't sleep too well and wasn't too cheerful, but the rest of the crowd said what a fool I was to go swimming and get so badly sunburned. No wonder I was out of sorts.

However, they all figured that Harrison had quit the job and gone somewhere else - and nobody gave it a thought. I got back to college in time and I haven't been back to Montana since.

I know it is customary to ask if there any questions. I want to reverse that procedure and first ask a question myself. What would you have done?

ii. ELEANOR ANDERSON, b. 03 Aug 1890; d. 07 Dec 1971, Kingston, RI; m. RUSH SOUTHGATE FAY, 14 May 1912, Washington, DC; b. Annapolis MD; d. Mar 1930, Washington DC, buried USNA Cemetery, Annapolis MD.

Notes for ELEANOR ANDERSON:
A memorial nameplate to her is attached to her husband's grave stone at the USNA Cemetery in Annapliis MD

Notes for RUSH SOUTHGATE FAY:
Had 9 siblings
Graduate of USNA 1909, Commander USN, submarine officer, died of pneumonia.
Served on battleships for 2 years after his graduation from USNA, then on a gunboat for 1 year, Submarines 3 years. During WWI he was the navigator on the "Georgia". Taught at USNA for three years - Steam Engineering. Graduate of Navy War College 1928-29. Served on Naval Examining Board, Navy Department, Washington DC.Was at one time Skipper (Captain) of the El Cano Gunboat, US Patrol on Yangtze River, China. Also was at one time Skipper (Captain) of Submarine E-3.


35. MARIETTA9 CARTWRIGHT (PAUL WILLARD8, DAVID WARREN7, DAVID C.6, BRYANT5, BRYANT4, EDWARD3, EDWARD2, WILLIAM1 CARTWRIGH) was born 1877, and died 1969. She married ALBERT BERTRAM GARDNER, son of EDWIN GARDNER and KATE HODGE. He was born 1875, and died 1938.

Children of MARIETTA CARTWRIGHT and ALBERT GARDNER are:
i. ALBERT BERTRAM10 GARDNER, JR, b. 1899; d. 1967.
ii. RALPH REGINALD GARDNER, b. 1902; d. 1963.
iii. HAROLD KENNETH GARDNER, b. 1906.
iv. PAUL EDWIN GARDNER, b. 1910.
v. WARREN CARTWRIGHT GARDNER, b. 1913; d. 1977; m. FLORETTE ALMERIA DONNELLY; b. 1916; d. 1996.
vi. LOTTIE RUTH GARDNER, b. 1917; d. 1994.
vii. GRACE MAY GARDNER, b. 1917; d. 1974.
viii. JOHN LYLE GARDNER, b. 1918; d. 1987.

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Prepared by Ross B Kenzie
6975 Sweetland Road Derby NY 14047
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